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Patrick Gallahue

                 
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Patrick Gallahue is a communications officer with the Global Drug Policy Program.

Prior to joining Open Society Foundations, Patrick spent three years at Harm Reduction International, researching human rights abuses stemming from drug control. Patrick also worked for seven years as a journalist in New York City, where he wrote about crime, local development, politics, and transport. In addition, he has worked with the International Centre on Human Rights and Drug Policy, Child Workers in Nepal, and The Dome Project’s Juvenile Justice Program. He holds an LLM in human rights law from the National University of Ireland, Galway.

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Tuesday, March 12, 2013      Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon
The International Narcotics Control Board Strains its Limited Credibility The International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) issued its Annual Report this week. The INCB, a body of independent experts based at the UN, ostensibly issues the document to provide a yearly update on the functioning of the international drug-control system. In practice, however, the reports are used as a mechanism to criticise states that deviate from repressive and supply-oriented international drug policies.

Thursday, December 20, 2012      Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon
On Drug Policy, Europe Shows Us the Money--and It's Ugly The goal of balanced drug policy was revealed to be more rhetoric than reality with the release of the first set of national profiles on drug-related public expenditure in Europe.