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Warren's Post Office Proposal: Palast Aims at the Wrong Target

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Investigative reporter Greg Palast is usually pretty good at peering behind the rhetoric and seeing what is really going on. But in tearing into Senator Elizabeth Warren's support of postal financial services, he has done a serious disservice to the underdogs -- both the underbanked and the US Postal Service itself.

In his February 27 article "Liz Warren Goes Postal," Palast attacked her support of the USPS Inspector General's proposal to add "non-bank" financial services to the US Postal Service, calling it "cruel, stupid and frightening" and equating it with the unethical payday lending practices it seeks to eliminate.

After "several thousand tweets by enraged liberals," he wrote a follow-up article called "Brains Lost in Mail--Postal Bank Bunkum," in which he contends, "the Postal Governors are running a slick, slick campaign" to "use federal property to run illegal loan-sharking shops." He says they would "team up with commercial banks to cash in on payday predation," exempting themselves from Warren's own consumer protection regulations.

His first article concludes:

While the USPS wants to "partner" with big banks, why not, instead, allow community credit unions to use post offices as annexes to provide full, complete, non-usurious neighborhood banking services? This is the type of full-service "postal banking" successful in Switzerland and Japan that is envisioned by Ellen Brown, not the payday predation proposed by the USPS.

I obviously agree with him on the full-service postal banking alternative, but that is not something Congress appears ready to approve. Palast has not looked closely at the white paper from the Inspector General's office  relied on by Senator Warren , or at the research on payday lending and the inability of credit unions to service that market. The IG's proposal, rather than fleecing the poor, would save them from being fleeced by offering basic financial services at much reduced rates. And that makes it a very good start. 

The Straits and Strictures of the USPS

In analyzing the proposal, we need to consider the stressed circumstances and limitations of the Postal Service. It is fighting for its life, after the nefarious 2006 Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA) rendered it insolvent. Apparently intended to force the privatization of the post office, the Act required the prefunding of postal retiree health benefits   for 75 years into the future. That means funding workers not yet born, an onerous burden no other public or private company is required to carry. 

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Worse, as the white paper notes:  

The 2006 Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA) generally prohibits the Postal Service from offering new nonpostal services. However, given that the Postal Service is already providing money orders and other types of non-bank financial services, it could explore additional options within its existing authority.

Given the hostility among conservatives in Congress to postal expansion of any sort, full-service banking (involving deposits, checking and savings accounts, and home and business loans) is unlikely to be authorized any time soon. But the proposed prepaid Postal Cards would simply be an electronic 21st century extension of paper money orders, and short-term Postal Loans could be construed as advances on those cards. According to the white paper, the proposed Postal Card would cost users less than half what they pay for prepaid cards now, and Postal Loans would cost them less than one-tenth the cost of a payday loan, a substantial savings for the poor.

It sounds good, but where will the post office get the money for the loans if it cannot branch into taking deposits? And where will it get the capital to back the loans when it is insolvent? The white paper states:

Electronic payment products like Postal Cards might be a wise entry point, and would expand upon existing services like paper money orders. . . . The right partners could bring much needed startup cash to the table as part of the deal, overcoming the Postal Service's current funding limitations.

The white paper also suggests partnering with banks for the back-end network and expertise necessary to deal with a national or global card system. But the RIGHT partners are emphasized:

One important note of caution: the Postal Service should be very mindful to ensure that no partnership damages its reputation. The level of trust the Postal Service has earned from the public is an unmatched asset, and one that should not be jeopardized.

Billions More for the Poor

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The white paper notes that more than a quarter of all US households do not have a bank account, or use costly services like payday loans and check-cashing exchanges just to make ends meet. People who filed for bankruptcy in 2012 were on average just $26 per month short of meeting their expenses, so even modest savings would make a major difference to them:

The average underserved household has an annual income of about $25,500 and spends about $2,412 of that just on alternative financial services fees and interest. That amounts to 9.5 percent of their income. To put that into perspective, that is about the same portion of income that the average American household spends on food in one year. In 2012 alone, the underserved paid some $89 billion in fees and interest.

Banks are closing branches all over the country, mostly in low-income areas; but post offices are still to be found everywhere. They could offer affordable financial services that would save the underserved billions of dollars in exorbitant fees and interest.

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Ellen Brown is an attorney, founder of the Public Banking Institute, and author of twelve books including the best-selling WEB OF DEBT. In THE PUBLIC BANK SOLUTION, her latest book, she explores successful public banking models historically and (more...)
 

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Like to think this an idea whose time has come bu... by jtenn on Friday, Mar 14, 2014 at 6:40:55 PM
Agreed, it's a bit slow going.  But it's the ... by Ellen Brown on Friday, Mar 14, 2014 at 9:46:40 PM
( the difference lies in the fact that YOU have n... by jtenn on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 10:28:41 AM
Thank you so much for your important, understandab... by Sheila Parks on Friday, Mar 14, 2014 at 10:56:06 PM
I'm just glad to know you are their gleaning idea... by jtenn on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 10:25:13 AM
I remember as a 6 yr old in 1932 being taken to th... by Arthur M. Howard-(Scotoni) on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 10:36:35 AM
Yes, thanks for restimulating that memory in me! &... by Steve Hudson on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 11:48:49 AM
Ellen Brown, Sen Elizabeth Warren and others are... by Ronald Baker on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 11:09:38 AM
  I thought Palast's vicious verbal attacks ... by Steve Hudson on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 12:07:37 PM
The USPS is fighting to survive.  It doesn't ... by Ellen Brown on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 1:18:39 PM
In my view, Ellen Brown misses the point of Pal... by Paul Krumm on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 1:53:48 PM
Credit unions can't do it for less than the USPS c... by Ellen Brown on Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 5:03:15 PM