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WPost's Anti-Putin "Group Think"

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Headlined to H2 3/20/14

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Source: Consortium News

Washington Post editorial writer Charles Lane appearing on Fox News.
Washington Post editorial writer Charles Lane appearing on Fox News.
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Consortium News)

Not since Feb. 6, 2003, the day after Secretary of State Colin Powell wowed the world with his slam-dunk speech "proving" that Iraq was hiding WMD, has the Washington Post's editorial section shown this unity of "group think." On Thursday, the Post presented a solid phalanx of denunciations directed at Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Across the two editorial pages, Post writers and columnists stood, shoulder to shoulder, beating their chests about Putin as evil, mad, or both. "A dangerous Russian doctrine," screamed the lead editorial. "An elemental fear" was the headline of a George F. Will column. "Making Russia pay" was the goal of Sen. Marco Rubio's opinion article. "Putin's fantasy world" was explored by editorialist Charles Lane.

The one slightly out-of-step pundit was E.J. Dionne Jr., whose column -- "Can Crimea bring us together?" -- agreed on Putin's dastardly behavior but added the discordant note that most Americans weren't onboard and didn't want their government to "get too involved" in the dispute over Ukraine and Crimea.

All the other opinion articles marched in lockstep to the theme that Putin was crazy and delusional. The Post's lead editorial favorably quoted Secretary of State John Kerry as saying that Putin's speech about the Ukraine crisis "just didn't jibe with reality."

This was the same John Kerry, who earlier in the Ukraine crisis, denounced Putin's intervention in Crimea by declaring that "you just don't in the 21st Century behave in 19th Century fashion by invading another country on completely trumped-up pretext." Kerry, of course, voted in 2002 to authorize the U.S. invasion of Iraq in pursuit of hidden WMD stockpiles that didn't exist.

However, what now should be painfully clear is that since almost no one in Official Washington paid any serious price for following neocon propaganda into the Iraq War a decade ago, the same patterns continue to assert and reassert themselves in other crises a decade or more later, often executed by the same people.

The Washington Post's editorial page is run by literally the same people who ran it when all those Post's opinion leaders were standing with the estimable Colin Powell on Feb. 6, 2003, and asserting the existence of Iraq's WMD as "flat fact." Fred Hiatt is still the editorial-page editor and Jackson Diehl is still his deputy.

Putin's Thoughtful Address

Yet, contrary to the Post's latest "group think," Putin delivered a rather remarkable, even insightful speech on Tuesday, explaining Russia's not unreasonable view of recent history. Recognizing the actual U.S. approach to the world -- not the fairy-tale one favored by Kerry and the Post -- Putin said:

"Like a mirror, the situation in Ukraine reflects what is going on and what has been happening in the world over the past several decades. After the dissolution   of bipolarity on the planet [i.e., the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991], we no longer have stability. Key international institutions are not getting any stronger; on the contrary, in many cases, they are sadly degrading.

"Our western partners, led by the United States of America, prefer not to be guided by international law in their practical policies, but by the rule of the gun. They have come to believe in their exclusivity and exceptionalism, that they can decide the destinies of the world, that only they can ever be right.

"They act as they please: here and there, they use force against sovereign states, building coalitions based on the principle 'If you are not with us, you are against us.' To make this aggression look legitimate, they force the necessary resolutions from international organizations, and if for some reason this does not work, they simply ignore the UN Security Council and the UN overall."

Nothing in that key passage of Putin's speech is crazy. He is stating the reality of the current era, though one could argue that this U.S. aggressive behavior was occurring during the Cold War as well. Really, since World War II, Washington has been in the business of routinely subverting troublesome governments (including overthrowing democratically elected leaders) and invading countries (that for some reason got in Washington's way).

It is a challenge to list all the examples of U.S. interventions abroad, both in America's "backyard" (Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, Nicaragua, Grenada, Haiti, Venezuela, Honduras, etc.) and in far-flung parts of the world (Iran, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Congo, Lebanon, Serbia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Yemen, Somalia, Libya, etc.). These actions -- usually outside international law and in violation of those nations' sovereignty -- have continued into the current century and the current administration.

It's also true that the United States has behaved harshly toward Russia during much of the post-Cold War era, reneging on an understanding with Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev that his concessions to President George H.W. Bush regarding German reunification and Eastern Europe would not be exploited by the U.S. government.

Yet, the U.S. government and corporate America moved aggressively against Russia in the post-Soviet era, helping to plunder Russia's resources and pushing the frontlines of NATO right up to Russia's borders. For all his autocratic faults, Putin has moved to put a stop to these encroachments against Russian national interests.

Offending the Neocons

Putin also has helped President Barack Obama extricate the United States from dangerous situations in Syria and Iran -- while the neocons and Washington Post's editorialists were pounding the drums for more confrontation and war.

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http://www.consortiumnews.com

Robert Parry broke many of the Iran-Contra stories in the 1980s for the Associated Press and Newsweek. His latest book, Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq, can be ordered at secrecyandprivilege.com. It's also available at more...)
 
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Interesting Article ___What is this USA obsession ... by urb musak on Friday, Mar 21, 2014 at 7:42:19 PM