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Peter Van Buren, Regime Change in America

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This article originally appeared at TomDispatch.com. To receive TomDispatch in your inbox three times a week, click here.

The old words are on the rebound, the ones that went out in the last century when the very idea of a  Gilded Age, and the plutocrats and oligarchy of wealth that went with it, left the scene in the Great Depression.  Now, those three classic terms that were never to return (or so it once seemed) are back in our vocabularies.  They've been green-lighted by society.  (If they're not on SAT tests in the coming years, I'll eat my top hat.)

Of course, an inequality gap has been widening into an abyss for decades now, but when it comes to the present boom in old-fashioned words that once went with being really, really, obscenely wealthy and powerful, give the Occupy movement of 2011 credit.  After all, they were the ones who took what should already have been on everyone's lips -- the raging inequality in American society -- out of the closet and made it part of the national conversation.  1%!  99%!

Now, the stats on national and global inequality are everyday fare (and looking worse all the time).  Meanwhile, the book of a French (French!) economist about how the U.S. is leading the way when it comes to inequality and possibly creating the basis for a future... yes!... oligarchy of inherited wealth is on the bestseller list and the talk of the town.  And if that weren't enough, a new study out of Princeton University suggests that, as Talking Points Memo put it, "Over the past few decades America's political system has slowly transformed from a democracy into an oligarchy, where wealthy elites wield most power."  As the two authors of the study write, "The central point that emerges from our research is that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy, while mass-based interest groups and average citizens have little or no independent influence."

In an America where, when it comes to the political system, the Supreme Court has now granted the dollar the full right to speak its mind, and ever more of those dollars can be found in the pockets of... well, not to put a fine point on it, plutocrats, we need a new (that is, old) vocabulary to fit our changing circumstances.

In all of this, one thing missing has been the classic American observer, the keen reporter setting out on the road to catch the new look of a land in pain and misery.  Today, TomDispatch aims to remedy that.  Peter Van Buren, former State Department whistleblower and author of a new book on American inequality, Ghosts of Tom Joad: A Story of the #99Percent, has been traveling the ever-expanding, ever-rustier Rust Belt taking the temperature of a land with a significant fever. Here's his account. Tom 

This Land Isn't Your Land, This Land Is Their Land 
An Empire in Decline (City by City, Town by Town) 
By Peter Van Buren

As America's new economy starts to look more like the old economy of the Great Depression, the divide between rich and poor, those who have made it and those who never will, seems to grow ever starker. I know. I've seen it firsthand.

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Once upon a time, I worked as a State Department officer, helping to carry out the occupation of Iraq, where Washington's goal was regime change. It was there that, in a way, I had my first taste of the life of the 1%. Unlike most Iraqis, I had more food and amenities than I could squander, nearly unlimited funds to spend as I wished (as long as the spending supported us one-percenters), and plenty of U.S. Army muscle around to keep the other 99% at bay. However, my subsequent whistleblowing about State Department waste and mismanagement in Iraq ended my 24-year career abroad and, after a two-decade absence, deposited me back in "the homeland."

I returned to America to find another sort of regime change underway, only I wasn't among the 1% for this one. Instead, I ended up working in the new minimum-wage economy and saw firsthand what a life of lousy pay and barely adequate food benefits adds up to. For the version of regime change that found me working in a big box store, no cruise missiles had been deployed and there had been no shock-and-awe demonstrations. Nonetheless, the cumulative effects of years of deindustrialization, declining salaries, absent benefits, and weakened unions, along with a rise in meth and alcohol abuse, a broad-based loss of good jobs, and soaring inequality seemed similar enough to me. The destruction of a way of life in the service of the goals of the 1%, whether in Iraq or at home, was hard to miss. Still, I had the urge to see more. Unlike in Iraq, where my movements were limited, here at home I could hit the road, so I set off for a look at some of America's iconic places as part of the research for my book, Ghosts of Tom Joad.

Here, then, are snapshots of four of the spots I visited in an empire in decline, places you might pass through if you wanted to know where we've been, where we are now, and (heaven help us) where we're going.

On the Boardwalk: Atlantic City, New Jersey

Drive in to Atlantic City on the old roads, and you're sure to pass Lucy the Elephant. She's not a real elephant, of course, but a wood and tin six-story hollow statue. First built in 1881 to add value to some Jersey swampland, Lucy has been reincarnated several times after suffering fire, neglect, and storm damage. Along the way, she was a tavern, a hotel, and -- for most of her life -- simply an "attraction." As owning a car and family driving vacations became egalitarian rights in the booming postwar economy of the 1950s and 1960s, all manner of tacky attractions popped up along America's roads: cement dinosaurs, teepee-shaped motels, museums of oddities, and spectacles like the world's largest ball of twine. Their growth paralleled 20 to 30 years of the greatest boom times any consumer society has ever known.

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Between 1947 and 1973, actual incomes in the United States rose remarkably evenly across society. Certainly, there was always inequality, but never as sharp and predatory as it is today. As Scott Martelle's Detroit: A Biography chronicles, in 1932, Detroit produced 1.4 million cars; in 1950, that number was eight million; in 1973, it peaked at 12 million. America was still a developing nation -- in the best sense of that word.

Yet as the U.S. economy changed, money began to flow out of the working class pockets that fed Lucy and her roadside attraction pals. By one count, from 1979 to 2007, the top 1% of Americans saw their income grow by 281%. They came to control 43% of U.S. wealth.

You could see it all in Atlantic City, New Jersey. For most of its early life, it had been a workingman's playground and vacation spot, centered around its famous boardwalk. Remember Monopoly? The street names are all from Atlantic City. However, in the economic hard times of the 1970s, as money was sucked upward from working people, Boardwalk and Park Place became a crime scene, too dangerous for most visitors. Illegal drug sales all but overtook tourism as the city's most profitable business.

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Tom Engelhardt, who runs the Nation Institute's Tomdispatch.com ("a regular antidote to the mainstream media"), is the co-founder of the American Empire Project and, most recently, the author of Mission Unaccomplished: Tomdispatch (more...)
 

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