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The World Cup Spilleth Over: As the Soccer Games End, Political Ones Begin

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opednews.com Headlined to H4 7/10/14

The World Cup Spilleth Over: As the Soccer Games End, Political Ones Begin

By Danny Schechter

New York, New York: The World Cup has spilleth over. With the FIFA spectacle about to pack up its goodies--most of their lucre has already been wired out of Brazil--it's time for hype for the next global spectacle, as the "host" country now tries to cope with its financial losses, intensified social conflicts and humiliating defeat at the hands of the Germans after earlier losing their star player to a nasty collision on the field, and their valiant Captain to a penalty.

On s symbolic level, Brazil's bashing at the feet of Germany using bum rush tactics compared to the Nazi "Blitzgrieg" brought smiles to Old Europe, and pain to a nation struggling with massive poverty and inequality.

In a way, it underscored the dependence and anger that so many Brazilians felt, even as the issues they have raising and marching to call attention to, have all been but ignored by the sportscasters who know game scores but not the scores of life--the great gaps that events like the World Cup paper over.

We saw this movie before, just 4 years ago, in South Africa where warnings of corrupt practices and unreasonable demands by FIFA---to have companies they pick build unwanted and unneeded stadiums, and control all TV rights, among other "requirements"" insuring they controlled the events and made the most money--were lost in well orchestrated patriotic fervor to bring the games to Africa for the first time.

South Africans were persuaded after years of struggling for freedom that they had finally arrived in the big time

In the end, FIFA made more money off the games in South Africa than in any earlier World Cup. There were plenty of photo ops and mutual congratulations, but, afterwards, the county was left with a large debt and white elephant stadiums, like the one in Cape Town which some critics want to turn into a low income housing project in a "Mother City" known for its shacks and packed slum-like townships

At the time, South African media turned down a powerful documentary forecasting these problems. To the ANC, the ruling party, the FIFA party was the one to embrace even as fans brought their own invention, to the games---wailing horns that expressed both joy and disquiet. Called the vuvuzela /vuːvuːˈzɛlə/, it produces a traditional loud monotone note that was barely tolerated by FIFA officialdom because it was seen as disruptive, interfering with their marketing and all the selling that was going on.

South Africa's two week mother of all parties soon gave way to a reality sandwich in the form of a debt that may take decades to pay.

They didn't expect to win the cup--the Brazilians did. It would have been their sixth. Thus, the loss had profound psychological repercussions, as Doug Foster reported in The Atlantic:

""the loss had been treated as a national catastrophe akin to defeat in war. The writer Nelson Rodrigues even claimed that it was a kind of psychological cataclysm, creating an inferiority complex, one infused with racial stigma, in the population. Since Uruguay had fielded a largely white team, he noted, while Brazil had been represented by seven Afro-Brazilians, including the goalkeeper, the loss provoked a color-coded experience of shame. He called it "complexo de vira-lata"-- the mongrel complex."

In many ways, reaction there to the Cup became an expression of a deep class tension that annoyed/inconvenienced the tourists, with is as much conflict in the streets, however downplayed by the world media, as competition on the field.

Just as the TV coverage reduced everything to numbers, so did sports writer Dave Zirin of the Nation:

"Here are some other numbers that will have much more bearing on both Brazil's present and future. These are the numbers that animate far more debate and discussion inside of Brazil than the US media, with their view from Copacabana beach, have portrayed.

$11-14 billion. That is how much the World Cup is going to end up costing the country. No one in government, when asked, is actually even sure as to what the final bill is going to be. This is not unique to Brazil by any means. Mega-events produce this kind of economic uncertainty and graft wherever they nest. But in a country where health and education are pressing issues, it stings.

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News Dissector Danny Schechter is blogger in chief at Mediachannel.Org He is the author of PLUNDER: Investigating Our Economic Calamity (Cosimo Books) available at Amazon.com. See Newsdisssector.org/store.htm.

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