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The "Sorry" State of American Diplomacy

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Photo Aaul Loeb/AP

On Tuesday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told Pakistani government officials she was "sorry" for the deaths of 24 Pakistani soldiers killed in American airstrikes last November.

With this acknowledgment, Pakistan agreed to re-open the supply lines to Afghanistan that had been closed since the incident.

It wasn't the formal "apology" Pakistan had demanded from the U.S. government as the pre- condition before considering a re-opening of the supply routes, but it was the best the Obama administration could come up with, considering the months of internal debate that ensued over whether it should formally admit to Pakistan any U.S. culpability for the attack.

But such is the state of U.S. "diplomacy" these days where the American global hegemonic state is always at pains to admit any wrongdoing for its transgressions lest it should appear "weak" in the face of potential condemnation coming from the domestic right wing echo chamber. So if innocents get killed while sleeping in their beds from our drone strikes or we send a missile that attacks celebrants in wedding party they're all insurgents and terrorists anyway and besides collateral damage happens in war. "Sorry".

Yet it's not just our diplomacy or perpetrating unnecessary war that is wanting, it's our overall militarized policy direction since 9/11. Not only the obsession with terrorists and terrorism, initiating unnecessary wars and occupations, drone strikes and missile attacks even in countries we're not at war with. It's also the increased militarization of our local and state police departments.

Domestically, we're becoming ever more obsessed with "security" concerns overtaking civil liberty protections and provisions of the law as legitimate peaceful protests are equivocated as threats and forcibly dealt with by local authorities with state and federal assistance.

And soon drones will fill our domestic skies to further our slide into the type of world George Orwell wrote about in his prescient "1984" novel.

It's all of the same piece, endless war, increased domestic surveillance and supremacy of the national security state acting with impunity along with feckless diplomacy ending in "sorry".

  How's this for irony. Last week Clinton accused Syrian dictator Bashar Assad of having "blood on his hands", which gets no argument from this quarter. What's noteworthy of course, neither she nor the government she represents acknowledges the "blood on their hands". That's the ultimate hypocrisy.

After all, this is America. We're "exceptional" and "entitled". We don't answer to anyone. "Sorry".

 

dglefc22733@aol.com

Retired. The author of "DECEIT AND EXCESS IN AMERICA, HOW THE MONEYED INTERESTS HAVE STOLEN AMERICA AND HOW WE CAN GET IT BACK", Authorhouse, 2009

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