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The Rich Are Funny (Sunday Homily)

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Readings for 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time: AM 8:4-7; PS 113: 1-2, 4-8; I TM 2:1-8; LK16: 1-13 http://usccb.org/bible/readings/092213.cfm

Jesus loved telling stories that made fun of rich people. He's at it again in this morning's gospel.

You can imagine the delight such parables brought Jesus' audiences of poor peasants, fishermen, beggars, prostitutes, and unemployed day laborers. They surely chuckled as he spun tales about "stewards" who couldn't dig a hole in the ground if their life depended on it or who were mortified at the very thought of begging. They'd laugh about rich landowners storing up grain and dying before they had a chance to enjoy their profits. They knew what Jesus meant when he mocked pathetically avaricious landlords getting angry when their money managers failed to increase their bank accounts while the boss was away attending parties. They'd shake their heads knowingly when Jesus mocked heartless employers who reaped where they didn't sow.

Jesus' listeners would have found today's story especially entertaining. After all it featured an accountant who cheated his wealthy employer. And then the rich guy ends up appreciating the accountant's dishonesty.  Men and women in Jesus' audience would have nudged each other and smiled knowingly at the tale.

"That's the way those people are," they'd laugh.  "They're so dishonest; they can't help appreciating corruption in others, even when it means they're getting screwed themselves!

"Yeah, the rich stick together," the crowds would agree. "Their greed and dishonesty is the glue. They know: today it's you getting caught with your hand in the till. Tomorrow it might be me. So let's not be too hard on one another.

"Ha, ha, what a joke they are!"

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In today's first reading, the prophet Amos uses a different tactic to decry the rich. Instead of humor, Amos straight out lambasts them for "trampling on the needy," and exploiting poor farmers. They're so eager to make money, Amos charged; they can't wait till the Sabbath ends so they can resume their dirty work. Then first chance they get, the crooks manipulate currencies and rig scales in their favor and short-change the buyer. They sell shoddy products and underpay workers.  God will never forget such crimes, Amos angrily declares.

Our responsorial psalm agrees with the prophet. The psalmist reminds us that God is not on the side of the rich, but of the poor.  In fact God so honors the lowly that (S)he considers them royalty.  "He seats them with princes" the psalmist says. Yahweh rescues the lowly from their greedy exploiters.

So Jesus ridicules the rich with humor, while Amos wrings his hands over their crimes with righteous indignation. Both approaches highlight the basic truth put so memorably by Jesus when he says in today's reading from Luke that we have to choose between money and the biblical God who champions the poor. It's one or the other. We can't serve two masters.

"So be like the rich guys in today's story," Jesus adds with a twinkle in his eye. He searches the crowd for the pickpockets, the "lame" and "blind" beggars. He looks for the hookers and tax collectors.

"Stick together," he says. Then he winks.  "And that dishonest money you depend on . . . Spread it around and help us all out.
 
"Better yet, give it to the Resistance Movement and you'll get one of those rich guys' houses when the Romans are gone and the Kingdom comes." 

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Everyone laughs.

 

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Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Recently retired, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 36 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program.Mike blogs (more...)
 

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