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The Ghoulish Face of Empire

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Cross-posted from Truthdig


Protesters posing as Tony Blair, George Bush and Gordon Brown outside the inquiry. Their hands were bloodied and they held dollar bills to signify their belief that the Iraq invasion was over oil
(image by Getty Images)


The black-clad fighters of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, sweeping a collapsing army and terrified Iraqis before them as they advance toward Baghdad, reflect back to us the ghoulish face of American empire. They are the specters of the hundreds of thousands of people we murdered in our deluded quest to remake the Middle East. They are ghosts from the innumerable roadsides and villages where U.S. soldiers and Marines, jolted by explosions of improvised explosive devices, responded with indiscriminate fire. They are the risen remains of the dismembered Iraqis left behind by blasts of Hellfire and cruise missiles, howitzers, grenade launchers and drone strikes. They are the avengers of the gruesome torture and the sexual debasement that often came with being detained by American troops. They are the final answer to the collective humiliation of an occupied country, the logical outcome of Shock and Awe, the Frankenstein monster stitched together from the body parts we left scattered on the ground. They are what we get for the $4 trillion we wasted on the Iraq War.

The language of violence engenders violence. The language of hate engenders hate. "I and the public know what all schoolchildren learn," W.H. Auden wrote. "Those to whom evil is done do evil in return." It is as old as the Bible.

There is no fight left in us. The war is over. We destroyed Iraq as a unified country. It will never be put back together. We are reduced -- in what must be an act of divine justice decreed by the gods, whom we have discovered to our dismay are Islamic -- to pleading with Iran for military assistance to shield the corrupt and despised U.S. protectorate led by Nouri al-Maliki.

We are not, as we thought when we entered Iraq, the omnipotent superpower able in a swift and brutal stroke to bend a people to our will. We are something else. Fools and murderers. Blinded by hubris. Faded relics of the Cold War. And now, in the final act of the play, we are crawling away. Our empire is dying.

We should have heeded, while we had a chance, the wails of mothers and fathers. We should have listened to the cries of the wounded. We should have wept over the bodies of Iraqi children lined up in neat rows in the morgues. We should have honored grief so we could honor life. But the dance of death is intoxicating. Once it begins you whirl in an ecstatic frenzy. Death's embrace, which feels at first like sexual lust, tightens and tightens until you suffocate. Now the music has stopped. All we have left are loss and pain.

And where are the voices of sanity? Why are the cheerleaders of slaughter, who have been wrong about Iraq since before the invasion, still urging us toward ruin? Why are those who destabilized Iraq and the region in the worst strategic blunder in American history still given a hearing? Why do we listen to simpletons and morons?

They bang their fists. They yell. They throw tantrums. They demand that the world conform to their childish vision. It is as if they have learned nothing from the 11 years of useless slaughter. As if they can dominate that which they never had the power to dominate.

I sat in a restaurant Thursday in Boston's Kenmore Square with military historian Andrew Bacevich. You won't hear his voice much on the airwaves. He is an apostate. He speaks of the world as it is, not the self-delusional world our empire builders expect it to be. He knows war with a painful intimacy, not only as a Vietnam combat veteran and a retired Army colonel but also as the father of a U.S. Army officer killed in a 2007 suicide bombing in Iraq.

"In the 1990s there was a considerable effort made in the military, but also in the larger community of national security experts scratching their heads and [asking] what are the implications of all this technology," he said...

"They conceived of something called the Revolution in Military Affairs -- RMA. If you believed in the Revolution of Military Affairs you knew that nothing could stop the United States military when it engaged in a conflict. Victory was, for all practical purposes, a certainty. People like Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Wolfowitz, and I expect Dick Cheney also, bought this hook, line and sinker. You put yourself in their shoes in the wake of 9/11. An attack comes out of Afghanistan, a country frankly nobody cares about, and you conceive of this grand strategy of trying to transform the Islamic world. Where are we going to start? We are going to start by attacking a country [Iraq] -- we had it under surveillance and sanctions for the past decade -- where there is a bona fide bad guy to make a moral case and where we are confident we can make short work of this adversary, a further demonstration that the American military cannot be stopped.
"They utterly and totally miscalculated. Iraq is falling apart. And many of these people, either in government or outside of government, who were proponents of the war are now advocating for a resumption of the American war. Not one of them is willing to acknowledge the extent of that military miscalculation. Once you acknowledge it, then the whole project of militarizing U.S. policy towards the Greater Middle East collapses."

Bacevich blames the concentration of power into the hands of the executive branch for the debacle. He said that since the Kennedy administration...

"the incoming president and his team, it does not matter which party, see the permanent government as a problem. If we [the new officials] are going to get done what we want to get done we have to find ways to marginalize the permanent government. This has led to the centralization of authority in the White House and means decisions are made by a very small number of people. The consultation becomes increasingly informal, to the point it is not even documented."

"I do not think we even know when the decision to go to war with Iraq was actually made," Bacevich said...

"There is no documented meeting where [President George W.] Bush sat down with how many people -- six, 10, 25 -- and said, 'Let's vote.' The decision kind of emerged and therefore was implemented. Why would you operate that way? You would operate that way if you viewed the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the CIA and the State Department as, in a sense, the enemy."

"The invasion of Iraq was intended to be a catalyst," he said...

"It was supposed to be the catalyst that would enable us ... to change the region. It turned out to be the catalyst that resulted in destabilization. The big question of the moment is not what can we do or is there anything we can do to salvage Iraq. The question is to what degree have our actions resulted in this larger regional mayhem. And to the extent they have, isn't it time to rethink fundamentally our expectations of what American power, and particularly American military power, can achieve?"

"We need to take a radically different course," Bacevich said...

"There is an analogy to be made with Great Britain in the wake of World War I. It was in World War I that Britain and France collaborated to dismantle the Ottoman Empire to create the new Middle East. While on the one hand there was an awareness that Britain was in decline, at the level where policy was made there was not a willingness to consider the implications of that fact. It took World War II to drive it home--that the [British] empire was doomed. I think that is where we are."

Out of this decline, Bacevich said, is emerging a multipolar order. The United States will no longer be able to operate as an unchallenged superpower. But, he said, similar to what happened as the British Empire took its last gasps, "there is very little willingness in Washington or in policy circles to take on board the implications multipolarity would call for in terms of adjusting our policy."

The inability to adjust to our declining power means that the United States will continue to squander its resources, its money and its military.

"By squandering power we forfeit our influence because we look stupid and we bankrupt ourselves," Bacevich said...

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Chris Hedges spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He has reported from more than 50 countries and has worked for The Christian Science Monitor, National Public Radio, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Times, for which he was a foreign correspondent for 15 years.

Hedges was part of the team of (more...)
 
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Sad article, as most of Hedges' writing is. But th... by Pal Palsimon on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 4:06:04 AM
Pay no attention to the voices that constantly tel... by Samson on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 8:50:12 PM
Yes, Pal, impotent 'terrorists'. We all need to b... by Deena Stryker on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 9:32:01 PM
Wow! One of the best written articles I've read on... by Shirley Braverman on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 5:18:16 AM
Yes, and I hate to remind you how much of this mon... by Pal Palsimon on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 6:14:05 AM
Your reference to "Zionist objectives" touches upo... by Barry Sussman on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 8:40:28 AM
That is exactly right - th elites in both countrie... by Mark Sashine on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 9:14:18 AM
It serves the social conservatives and warhawks si... by Adam Smith on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 4:46:26 PM
Its always been a common misdirection to blame US ... by Samson on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 8:52:55 PM
One of hte reasons why no one seem stuff coming is... by Deena Stryker on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 9:35:59 PM
I know that is true, because I often do it myself;... by Pal Palsimon on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 2:21:25 AM
Thanks for that reminder Barry. I agree.Extremely ... by Pal Palsimon on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 9:11:17 PM
Bacevich said "An attack comes out of Afghanistan.... by Michael David Morrissey on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 2:32:50 PM
Correct - both Hedges and Bacevich (and many other... by Paul Carline on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 4:27:54 AM
It is swallow the official story or accept that th... by Peter Hindrup on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 4:52:11 AM
American Empire, my butt! As a short passage allud... by Jean SmilingCoyote on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 3:25:18 PM
Though I sympathize with Chris's feelings in that ... by E. J. N. on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 6:46:08 PM
Because the same corporations own the 'main-stream... by Samson on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 8:55:49 PM
The questions were rhetorical. ... by E. J. N. on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 9:21:27 PM
Although you are right "it was not unified," at le... by Pal Palsimon on Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 9:20:45 PM
Pal, as I understand it, al Queda was not interest... by E. J. N. on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 1:07:15 PM
' is to ignore the fact that prior to 2003 Iraq wa... by Peter Hindrup on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 4:57:31 AM
All good points and what do sentences like this me... by Robert S. Becker on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 11:09:44 AM
Thanks, Robert. I understand your point. And I wou... by E. J. N. on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 1:18:12 PM
I wasn't "blaming" so much as pointing out weaknes... by Robert S. Becker on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 8:32:09 PM
Robert, I certainly agree about those who blame Ob... by E. J. N. on Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 2:56:53 PM
Axis of Evil is better defined as US/UK/Israel. ... by George W.Reichel on Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 8:49:40 AM

 
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