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The Fountainhead

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WAS not interested in Paul Ryan, the man about to be nominated by the Republican party for the office of Vice President, until the name Ayn Rand popped up.

Ayn Rand, it was said, was one of the main inspirations for his particular philosophy. Since Ryan is being represented not as an ordinary, run-of-the-mill politician, like Mitt Romney, but as a profound political and economic thinker, the inspiration deserves some scrutiny.

LIKE MOST people in this country, Ayn Rand first entered my life as the author of The Fountainhead, a novel that came out four years before the birth of the State of Israel. It quickly became a bestseller. The movie based on it, with Gary Cooper playing the main role, was even more popular.

It is the story of an architect of genius (roughly similar to Frank Lloyd Wright) who follows his own individual style and disdains the tastes of the masses. When his architectural design for a housing project is altered by the builders, he blows the buildings up, defending his actions in court in a stirring speech in defense of individualism.

(Honest disclosure: I have often dreamed of doing the same to certain buildings in Tel Aviv, especially the luxury hotels built between my home and the sea.)

I started to read her second bestseller, Atlas Shrugged, in which she set out her philosophy in detail. But I must confess, to my eternal shame, that I never finished it. It bored me.

ONE DAY IN 1974, my friend Dan Ben-Amotz called me and demanded that I immediately meet a young genius he had discovered called Dr. Moshe Kroy.

Ben-Amotz was a character by himself. A man of my age, he was at the time Israel's most conspicuous humorist and an icon of the generation that fought in the 1948 war and created the new Hebrew culture. Ben-Amotz, like many of us, was not only a self-made man, but also self-invented. He was known as the ultimate Sabra (native-born Israeli). Much later it transpired that he was actually born in Poland, arrived in Palestine as a boy and adopted the very Hebrew-sounding name to replace his original name -- Moshe Tehilimzeigger ("reciter of psalms" in Yiddish).

He brought Kroy to my home and I was impressed. Here was an unusually erudite 24-year-old youngster, already a lecturer at Tel Aviv University, with thick glasses and very outspoken philosophical views.

It appeared that he was a True Believer in the teachings of Ayn Rand, which she called Objectivism. This proclaimed that egoism was the basic duty of every human being. Any kind of social commitment was a sin against nature. Only by serving his own interest and cleansing himself of any trace of altruism can a person truly fulfill himself. Society at large can progress only when it is based on such individuals, each one striving to serve only himself (or herself).

Such an outlook can be hugely attractive to a certain kind of individual. It provides them with a philosophical justification for the extreme exercise of egoism, not giving a damn for anyone else.

Kroy, and of course Ben-Amotz, were religiously devoted to this new creed. (This is, of course, an oxymoron, since Ayn Rand was a total unbeliever, condemning any form of religion, including the Jewish religion of her parents.) When I caught Ben-Amotz doing something which could be construed as beneficial to others, he went to great lengths in justifying it by proving that in the long run it was to his own ultimate advantage.

Kroy himself was obviously a very disturbed being. At the age of 41, he committed suicide. I was not certain whether Ayn Rand disturbed his mind or whether he was attracted to her because he was disturbed to start with.

AYN RAND was born as Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum in Saint Petersburg, which later became Petrograd, which later became Leningrad. She was 12 years old when the Bolshevik revolution broke out in that city. The pharmacy of her parents was taken over by the regime, and the bourgeois family fled to the Crimea, which was held by White Russian forces. Later they returned to their native city, where Alisa studied philosophy and even published a book in Russian. In 1926 she reached the US, leaving her parents behind.

She adopted the name of Ayn (rhymes with "swine," as she herself was wont to explain). She probably took the word from the Hebrew, where it means "eye." The surname Rand may be a contraction of her original German-Jewish family name.

Her early history may in some measure explain her abiding hatred for Communism and any kind of collectivism, including social democracy, as well as any kind of religion or statism. For her, the state was the enemy of the free individual. This led her naturally to embrace an unbridled laissez faire capitalism (what Shimon Peres called "swinish capitalism") and to reject any form of welfare state or safety net.

All this was well structured in her philosophy, which was adopted by believers all over the world. She once called herself "the most creative thinker alive." On another occasion, she asserted that in all the annals of philosophy, there were only three great thinkers, all starting with an A: Aristotle, Aquinas and Ayn Rand.

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errors:   1) Ayn Rand was not Jewish  ... by John Donohue on Saturday, Aug 25, 2012 at 11:05:24 PM
According to Wikipedia, the two "errors", are not ... by Dan Baron on Saturday, Aug 25, 2012 at 11:29:52 PM
Wikipedia is your little friend, but catching the ... by John Donohue on Tuesday, Aug 28, 2012 at 1:23:14 PM
I've never read anything written by Ayn Rand, but,... by Dan Baron on Saturday, Aug 25, 2012 at 11:17:17 PM
"Vanity, all is vanity" The premise of Atla... by Marika on Sunday, Aug 26, 2012 at 6:25:05 AM
Rand was not an anarchist, as some on the left see... by Darren Wolfe on Sunday, Aug 26, 2012 at 7:24:34 AM
to Ayn Rand's Objectivism is irreconcilable with h... by John Sanchez Jr. on Sunday, Aug 26, 2012 at 7:40:08 AM
I had several of my liberal family fall in love wi... by Natalie Oberman on Sunday, Aug 26, 2012 at 1:18:37 PM
I think you are right that Rand provides egocentri... by E. J. N. on Sunday, Aug 26, 2012 at 5:35:20 PM
Some feel good-isms therein, however the reality i... by Natalie Oberman on Wednesday, Aug 29, 2012 at 2:03:46 AM
I read the thread here with total amazement:1. It ... by Mark Sashine on Tuesday, Aug 28, 2012 at 2:15:02 PM
If you restrict your context to "all of us thinker... by John Donohue on Tuesday, Aug 28, 2012 at 5:56:52 PM
It is about a simple distinction between  som... by Mark Sashine on Tuesday, Aug 28, 2012 at 6:42:38 PM