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Sunday Homily: Pope Francis' New Song -- Seven Things You May Have Missed in 'The Joy of the Gospel'

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Readings for Second Sunday in Ordinary Time: IS 49: 3, 5-6; PS 40: 2, 4, 7-10; I COR 1: 1-3; JN 1: 29-34

What will Pope Francis do next? Since his election nine month ago, he seems to be in the news on a daily basis.

We all know, for instance, that he was Time Magazine's "Person of the Year." And just last week, the New York Times ran two substantial articles on him. "He has already transformed the tone of the papacy," one of those articles said, "confessing himself a sinner, declaring "Who am I to judge ' when asked about gays, and kneeling to wash the feet of inmates, including Muslims."

The article went on to describe the reforms the pope is making in the Vatican. He has disempowered influential conservatives favored by his predecessor, Benedict XVI. The demoted include American Cardinal Raymond L. Burke, and Italian Cardinal Mauro Piacenza, along with Archbishop Guido Pozzo. Such reactionaries have been replaced with Francis' allies like Secretary of State Pietro Parolin whom the pope listed among those he will make a cardinal in February.

Even more broadly, the Times described the pope's employment of six Jesuit "spies" to assess and report on various Vatican offices. That's making Roman apparatchiks very nervous. As a result, job insecurity has become the order of the day in Vatican City, where clerical careerists , the Times said, have responded like sulking teenagers plugging in their headphones, retiring to their rooms, and hoping the storm will pass them by.  

Another Times report last week detailed Pope Francis' recent appointments to the College of Cardinals. The Parolin appointment notwithstanding, the nominations represent a departure from tradition in that the majority of the 19 new cardinals will come from Latin America, Africa, and Asia instead of Italy and Europe. The appointees promise to change the tone of the consistory the pope plans to convene at the end of next month where discussions will begin about decentralizing church decision-making processes and about pastoral responses to changes in family structure including questions of divorce and homosexuality.

Couple last week's moves with last September's hugely successful mass demonstration in St. Peter's against the bombing of Syria, with his denunciation of free market capitalism, under-regulated financial speculation, and   "murderous" world-wide income inequality, and you have a worthy successor to John XXIII, the soon-to-be-canonized Great Reformer who convened the Second Vatican Council (1962-'65).  

Put otherwise, in a very short time, Pope Francis has made his own the words of today's responsorial psalm, "The Lord has put a new song in my mouth."   The song the pope is singing takes the emphasis off formal religion -- what the responsorial calls the "sacrifice and offerings."   That's not what God wants, the psalmist says.   Instead God's desire is "a people that hear and obey" -- specifically the law of justice that God has placed in the heart of all human beings whether they think of themselves as believers or not . So far, the pope's actions show that he agrees.

In terms of today's gospel reading -- a continued reflection on last Sunday's account of Jesus' baptism -- it's as if we're witnessing the descent of the Holy Spirit upon a man determined to follow in the footsteps of Jesus of Nazareth.

Like Jesus, Francis has made a "preferential option for the poor." He's signaled justice for the oppressed as the overriding theme of his papacy. He has completely rejected war as a solution to any of the world's problems. This pope is no hawk or friend of hawks -- or of the rich who advocate free market solutions to problems of poverty and its attendant hunger and disease. For him, terrorism is blowback for injustice.

As most of us know, all of this is clearly explained in Francis' "Evangelii Gaudium" whose significance in terms of church reform cannot be overstated. But there are some important aspects of the pope's exhortation that may have escaped notice. Let me name just seven that have special connection with today's liturgical readings and their emphasis on peace, justice and the Spirit of God. (Parenthetical numbers refer to the relevant sections in the papal document.):

  • "Evangelii Gaudium" is not trivial. The pope writes "In this exhortation my intention is to map out the path for the church to follow in the immediate future" (2).So the pope's concern for the poor and rejection of war are not simply expressions of his idiosyncratic aspirations. They represent attitudes and actions he expects the church and Roman Catholics to adopt. 

  • "Evangelii Gaudium" also represents a "remarkable about-face" relative to liberation theology. Significantly, the pope met with Gustavo Gutierrez, the doyen of liberation theology, last September. Gutierrez's themes are found throughout the pope's Exhortation -- the "preferential option for the poor" (198, 199), the affirmation of "popular piety" (122-126), the historical perspective (54), social analysis uncovering unfettered capitalism as homicidal (53, 57), and recognition of "structural sin" (59, 202). . . . 

  • Its position on private ownership is much more radical than many have acknowledged so far. The pope actually states that the goods of the earth belong to the poor, not simply to those who can pay for them. Quoting "an ancient sage," the pope says "The goods we possess don't really belong to us but to the poor" (57). Can you imagine a stronger rejection of capitalism's understanding of private property? 

  • In general, the Papal Exhortation is friendly towards theologians. This also represents an about-face from his immediate predecessor who routinely investigated, warned, condemned and silenced theologians -- 106 of them by Matthew Fox's count. By contrast, Pope Francis values the role of theologians whatever categories of reason they might use -- even, one might conclude, if the categories are Marxist. Consider the suggestion in these words:   "When certain categories of reason and the sciences are taken up into the proclamation of the message, these categories then become tools of evangelization; water is changed into wine. Whatever is taken up is not just redeemed, but becomes an instrument of the Spirit for enlightening and renewing the world. . . The church . . . appreciates and encourages the charism of theologians." 

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Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Recently retired, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 36 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program.Mike blogs (more...)
 

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So far, so good as far as this pope's brief reign ... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 1:00:02 AM
The link to wikipedia article on 'Liberation theol... by Charles Roll on Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 12:21:50 PM
I agree, Charles. And sorry about the link error o... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 9:32:53 PM
BTW: you may have missed this OEN story, about the... by Charles Roll on Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 1:16:54 PM
This one humble man could conceivably turn the wor... by Daniel Geery on Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 1:38:05 PM
Dan, it's just amazing to me how much power the p... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 9:26:22 PM
A I read from your comment," ... This one humble ... by E. T. SIMON on Monday, Jan 20, 2014 at 7:56:48 AM
It appears to be so, though George Little seemed t... by Daniel Geery on Monday, Jan 20, 2014 at 12:16:31 PM
I wish he'd give Paul Ryan a personal call, give h... by janet O'Connell on Monday, Jan 20, 2014 at 7:28:29 AM