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State of Fear

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Cross-posted from Truthdig


Illustration by Mr. Fish

Shannon McLeish of Florida is a 45-year-old married mother of two young children. She is a homeowner, a taxpayer and a safe driver. She votes in every election. She attends a Unitarian Universalist church on Sundays. She is also, like nearly all who have a relationship with the Occupy movement in the United States, being monitored by the federal government. She knows this because when she read FBI documents obtained by the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund (PCJF) through the Freedom of Information Act, she was startled to see a redaction that could only be referring to her. McLeish's story is the story of hundreds of thousands of people -- perhaps more -- whose lives are being invaded by the state. It is the story of a security and surveillance apparatus -- overseen by the executive branch under Barack Obama -- that has empowered the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security to silence the voices and obstruct the activity of citizens who question corporate power.

Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, executive director of the PCJF, said in a written statement about the released files: "This production [of information], which we believe is just the tip of the iceberg, is a window into the nationwide scope of the FBI's surveillance, monitoring, and reporting on peaceful protesters organizing with the Occupy movement. These documents show that the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security are treating protests against the corporate and banking structure of America as potential criminal and terrorist activity. These documents also show these federal agencies functioning as a de facto intelligence arm of Wall Street and Corporate America."

The FBI documents are not only a chilling example of how widespread this surveillance and obstruction has become, they are an explicit warning by the security services to all who consider dissent. Anyone who defies corporate power, even if he or she is nonviolent and acting within constitutional rights, is a suspect. These documents are part of the plan to make us fearful, compliant and disempowered. They mark, I suspect, a government attempt to end peaceful mass protests by responding with repression to the grievances of Americans. 

When the corporate-financed group FreedomWorks bused in goons to disrupt Democratic candidates' town hall meetings about the federal health care legislation in August 2009, Eric Zuesse of the Business Insider notes, "there was no FBI surveillance of those corporate-organized disruptions of legitimate democratic processes. There also were no subsequent FreedomWorks applications for Freedom of Information Act releases of FBI files regarding such surveillance being used against them -- because there was no such FBI campaign against them."

The combination of intimidation tactics by right-wing fringe groups, which speak in the language of violence and hate, with the state's massive intrusion into the personal affairs of the citizen is corporate fascism. And we are much farther down that road than many of us care to admit. 

"When activists took up relatively long-term residence in Zuccotti Park in New York City on Sept. 17 [in 2011], their message of outrage was a mirror to my own after we bailed out the banks with our tax dollars, then watched them get off scot-free without even a token attempt to help fix the wreckage they'd created," McLeish told me over the phone when I called her home...

"I personally lost considerable income and my retirement with the economic collapse, as well as more than half the value of my home. I could see the people around me struggling, too. I have friends, neighbors and family members that the banks refused to help, who lost their homes or were forced to pay for costly attorneys to defend themselves against fraudulent foreclosure attempts. People couldn't sell their homes, as they were worth so much less than what they'd paid for them. Homes all over the area, including in my neighborhood right near the downtown [of Ormond Beach, Fla.], were abandoned due to the foreclosure crisis -- and left to rot by the banks. Strip malls were emptied as businesses went bankrupt and closed their doors. More and more homeless people were wandering through the neighborhood -- people you could tell had never been homeless, just by virtue of what and how much they carried with them. Families were sleeping behind big-box stores, and my area was featured on national news repeatedly for the number of homeless families."

"These are some of the things that prompted me to create a Facebook page for Occupy in my area in solidarity with the courageous activists camping in Zuccotti -- the only group to fully give voice to what I saw as the issue: the corruption of pretty much everything from the economy to the environment to our social safety nets to our democratic system of governance due to corporate greed. The message of OWS [Occupy Wall Street] resonated deeply and moved me to action," she said.

The FBI documents obtained by the PCJF show that government security services began to monitor the activities of Occupy activists before the Zuccotti Park encampment was established. They revealed that when McLeish met with about 40 other activists in Daytona Beach, Fla., several undercover law enforcement officers were present.

"None of them identified themselves as law enforcement to meeting attendees, though a Homeland Security agent approached me afterward, probably because I facilitated the meeting," McLeish said...

"When the agent approached me after the meeting, it was pretty unnerving. I decided the best way to deal with it was head on. I responded with, 'I'm so glad you're here! There's a group making threats against us. I assume that's why you've come.' I think he was surprised. I don't think he acknowledged knowing about the threats from an online gun group. He said he wanted to make sure we weren't infiltrated by troublemakers. He asked if we'd meet with law enforcement to find out what we were allowed to do. I said I'd be happy to do so. He said he would check into the threats. He said he would put me in touch with someone from the Daytona Beach Police Department."

"I can't remember exactly when we met with Daytona Beach Police Department the first time," she said...

"It could have been the next day or the day after. There were about six or seven of us, and I think it was three officers: Deputy Chief Ben Walton, who is now retired, and two other high-ranking officers. If I remember correctly, I pretty much began the discussion by stating that we were aware of our right to protest. We would be glad to coordinate as much as possible to make the Police Department's job easier, but not to the point of infringing upon our rights."

"We agreed upon very low police presence -- one to a few officers -- on the basis of the threats made by the online gun group, but not for surveillance on citizens engaged in peaceful protest," she said.

The day-long event she and the other activists held on Oct. 15, 2011, was attended by more than 300 people. The past president of the local NAACP chapter spoke, as did a leader in the teachers union who was also a member of the school board, a couple of members of the postal union, the leader of a homeless coalition who was homeless himself, and a member of the Daytona State College Environmental Club. A female uniformed officer was present. McLeish noticed a man with a professional camera taking photographs of individual protesters in the crowd. She saw him later the same day amid several police officers. One officer confirmed that the photographer was with law enforcement but would not give more information, McLeish said. 

Daytona-area activists during the fall of 2011 continued to organize events, including sidewalk marches to banks. In most cases they notified the police in advance. At one big event, men in plain clothes and standing with folded arms surrounded a seated group as it held a teach-in.

"It was extremely intimidating, not to mention the effect on people walking by who might have joined us if it weren't for these heavy-handed tactics," McLeish said.

The local activists set up an Occupy encampment every weekend in December 2011.

"There were no incidents of any kind," McLeish said of the camp in Daytona...

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Chris Hedges spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He has reported from more than 50 countries and has worked for The Christian Science Monitor, National Public Radio, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Times, for which he was a foreign correspondent for 15 years.

Hedges was part of the team of (more...)
 

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The KGB, The StaSi, The Securitate, the Chinese, N... by Ad Du on Monday, Jan 7, 2013 at 12:56:37 PM
run everything. If there are 8 countries minimum g... by Steven G. Erickson on Monday, Jan 7, 2013 at 3:25:51 PM
It creates jobs where there are none. And it provi... by Paul Repstock on Monday, Jan 7, 2013 at 10:38:41 PM
then complaining about inconvenience or budgets be... by Paul Repstock on Monday, Jan 7, 2013 at 10:41:42 PM
Very well said, Paul.   You can hang with m... by Ned Lud on Tuesday, Jan 8, 2013 at 10:38:04 AM
A scary eye-opener about FBI surveillance of citiz... by Annamarie Bohus on Monday, Jan 7, 2013 at 11:26:36 PM
Doing the bidding of the Corporations. So of cours... by Poor old Dirt farmer on Tuesday, Jan 8, 2013 at 9:25:15 AM