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Second Thoughts about Pope Bergoglio: A Liberation Pope or Just More Blah, Blah?

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Francis I washing women's feet on Holy Thursday by cuucshuehn.net

I'm still trying to figure out the new pope, Francis I. Initially, I was very skeptical and even negative about his election. After all he was carrying all that baggage from Argentina's "dirty war." And some incidents there made me see Francis as just another right-winger in the tradition of his immediate predecessors, Benedict XVI and John Paul II. I called for his resignation.

Gradually however, I've come to question my rush to judgment. True, the new pope faltered with early missteps regarding women. He seemed to reiterate Benedict XVI's admonition to U.S. women religious to focus more on the issues of contraception, abortion, and same-sex marriage, rather than on issues of social justice for the poor and electoral politics. He even warned a group of sisters against becoming "spinsters" or "old maids" (depending on the translation) rather than fruitful celibates.

But then he went to that women's prison on Holy Thursday and drew fire from conservatives for including women among those whose feet he washed that day. I concluded that the jury is still out concerning Francis and women. Like most of us males, he clearly has room to grow.

As I wait for the jury's verdict, two recent incidents have led me towards a more positive evaluation in the court of my own mind. To begin with, Leonardo Boff, a leading liberation theologian who had been silenced by the Ratzinger-Wojtyla team, surprised me by his own positive assessment. He even identified the new pope as a "field" liberation theologian as opposed to a "desk" theologian. Despite his reservations in the past about liberation theology, Bergoglio, Boff said, was truly committed to the poor.   Boff was hopeful that the Argentinian might change the direction of the Vatican policy of suspicion and rejection over the last 30 years towards the "preferential option for the poor" so central in the thought of activists committed to the welfare of the world's poor majority.

Then last week a second occurrence made me think Boff might have a point. The pontiff made some surprisingly critical remarks about capitalism and ethics to a group of new ambassadors to the Vatican.

Here are some excerpts. They are worth quoting at length (emphases are added):

" . . . We must also acknowledge that the majority of the men and women of our time continue to live daily in situations of insecurity, with dire consequences. . . The financial crisis which we are experiencing makes us forget that its ultimate origin is to be found in . . . the denial of the primacy of human beings! We have created new idols. The worship of the golden calf of old (cf. Ex 32:15-34) has found a new and heartless image in the cult of money and the dictatorship of an economy which is faceless and lacking any truly humane goal.

The worldwide financial and economic crisis seems to highlight . . the gravely deficient human perspective, which reduces man to one of his needs alone, namely, consumption. Worse yet, human beings themselves are nowadays considered as consumer goods which can be used and thrown away. We have started a throw-away culture. This tendency is . . . being promoted! In circumstances like these, solidarity, which is the treasure of the poor, is often considered counterproductive, opposed to the logic of finance and the economy. While the income of a minority is increasing exponentially, that of the majority is crumbling. This imbalance results from ideologies which uphold the absolute autonomy of markets and financial speculation, and thus deny the right of control to States, which are themselves charged with providing for the common good. A new, invisible and at times virtual, tyranny is established, one which unilaterally and irremediably imposes its own laws and rules . . . The will to power and of possession has become limitless.

Concealed behind this attitude is a rejection of ethics, a rejection of God. Ethics, like solidarity, is a nuisance! It is regarded as counterproductive: as something too human, because it relativizes money and power; as a threat, because it rejects manipulation and subjection of people: because ethics leads to God, who is situated outside the categories of the market. God is thought to be unmanageable by these financiers, economists and politicians, God is unmanageable, even dangerous, because he calls man to his full realization and to independence from any kind of slavery. . . I encourage the financial experts and the political leaders of your countries to consider the words of Saint John Chrysostom: "Not to share one's goods with the poor is to rob them and to deprive them of life. It is not our goods that we possess, but theirs" ( Homily on Lazarus , 1:6 -- PG 48, 992D).

. . . There is a need for financial reform along ethical lines that would produce in its turn an economic reform to benefit everyone. . .   Money has to serve, not to rule! The Pope . . . has the duty, in Christ's name, to remind the rich to help the poor, to respect them, to promote them. . . .

The common good should not be simply an extra, simply a conceptual scheme of inferior quality tacked onto political programs. . . . In this way, a new political and economic mindset would arise that would help to transform the absolute dichotomy between the economic and social spheres into a healthy symbiosis. . . .

Are you surprised by those words? Here the pope is saying that:

1.       The wealth gap between the rich and poor is completely unacceptable.

2.       It is caused by unfettered markets which reduce people to consumers subordinate to material production.

3.       Free markets are heartless, inhumane and idolatrous.

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Mike Rivage-Seul is a liberation theologian and former Roman Catholic priest. Recently retired, he taught at Berea College in Kentucky for 36 years where he directed Berea's Peace and Social Justice Studies Program.Mike blogs (more...)
 

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Yes, the pope's words are encouraging. But experie... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 8:21:20 AM
"The wealth gap between the rich and poor is compl... by Ad Du on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 9:54:00 AM
Dear Ad Du,I stand corrected. The poor, of course,... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 10:48:11 AM
Thanks for writing this, I was happy to see this p... by Paul McArthur on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 12:23:19 PM
Sorry, that's John Paul the 1st (Paul the 1st was ... by Paul McArthur on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 12:28:24 PM
Nicely put, Paul. And thanks for the Chossudovsky ... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 1:45:12 PM
I think he is thinking about the Global Elites, or... by Jeanne Macdonald on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 1:20:27 PM
Your point is well taken, Jeanne. However, don't y... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 1:49:20 PM
"[T]he increasing differences between those few wh... by Eugene Patrick Devany on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 2:42:05 PM
Good question, Eugene. What a wonderful statement ... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 3:06:22 PM
Do you know this song about liberation theology?:&... by Mike Rivage-Seul on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 at 6:13:38 AM
He is working on his 2nd Doctorate at 85.  Wo... by Lester Shepherd on Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 5:59:56 PM