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Obama and the Palin Effect: Parts 1 & 2

By Deepak Chopra  Posted by Rady Ananda (about the submitter)     Permalink       (Page 1 of 2 pages)
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opednews.com Headlined to H2 9/18/08

Part 1: Sept. 4, 2008

Sometimes politics has the uncanny effect of mirroring the national psyche even when nobody intended to do that.  This is perfectly illustrated by the rousing effect that Gov. Sarah Palin had on the Republican convention in Minneapolis this week.  On the surface, she outdoes former Vice President Dan Quayle as an unlikely choice, given her negligent parochial expertise in the complex affairs of governing. Her state of Alaska has less than 700,000 residents, which reduces the job of governor to the scale of running one-tenth of New York City.  By comparison, Rudy Giuliani is a towering international figure. Palin's pluck has been admired, and her forthrightness, but her real appeal goes deeper.

She is the reverse of Barack Obama, in essence his shadow, deriding his idealism and turning negativity into a cause for pride.  In psychological terms the shadow is that part of the psyche that hides out of sight, countering our aspirations, virtue, and vision with qualities we are ashamed to face: anger, fear, revenge, violence, selfishness, and suspicion of "the other."  For millions of Americans, Obama triggers those feelings, but they don't want to express them. He is calling for us to reach for our higher selves, and frankly, that stirs up hidden reactions of an unsavory kind.

Just to be perfectly clear, I am not making a verbal play out of the fact that Sen. Obama is black.  The shadow is a metaphor widely in use before his arrival on the scene.  I recognize that psychological analysis of politics is usually not welcome by the public, but I believe such a perspective can be helpful here to understand Palin's message.  In her acceptance speech Gov. Palin sent a rousing call to those who want to celebrate their resistance to change and a higher vision.

Look at what she stands for:

Small town values - a nostaligic return to simpler times disguises a denial of America's global role, a return to petty, small-minded parochialism.

Ignorance of world affairs - a repudiation of the need to repair America's image abroad.

Family values - a code for walling out anybody who makes a claim for social justice.  Such strangers, being outside the family, don't need to be needed.

Rigid stands on guns and abortion - a scornful repudiation that these issues can be negotiated with those who disagree.

Patriotism - the usual fallback in a failed war.

"Reform" - an italicized term, since in addition to cleaning out corruption and excessive spending, one also throws out anyone who doesn't fit your ideology.

Palin reinforces the overall message of the reactionary right, which has been in play since 1980, that social justice is liberal-radical, that minorities and immigrants, being different from "us" pure American types, can be ignored, that progressivism takes too much effort and globalism is a foreign threat. The radical right marches under the banners of "I'm all right, Jack," and "Why change? Everything's OK as it is."

The irony, of course, is that Gov. Palin is a woman and a reactionary at the same time. She can add mom to apple pie on her resume, while blithely reversing forty years of feminist progress. The irony is superficial; there are millions of women who stand on the side of conservatism, however obviously they are voting against their own good. The Republicans have won multiple national elections by raising shadow issues based on fear, rejection, hostility to change, and narrow-mindedness.  Obama's call for higher ideals in politics can't be seen in a vacuum. The shadow is real; it was bound to respond. Not just conservatives possess a shadow - we all do. So what comes next is a contest between the two forces of progress and inertia. Will the shadow win again, or has its furtive appeal become exhausted? No one can predict. The best thing about Gov. Palin is that she brought this conflict to light, which makes the upcoming debate honest. It would be a shame to elect another Reagan, whose smiling persona was a stalking horse for the reactionary forces that have brought us to the demoralized state we are in. We deserve to see what we are getting, without disguise.

Part 2: Sept. 18, 2008

My post a few weeks ago on Sarah Palin acting as Barack Obama's psychological shadow triggered a lot of people. I thought it would be worthwhile to talk about how one deals with the shadow once it breaks out and begins to disrupt things.

But first a short recap: The emergence of Gov. Palin wasn't simply startling - it was inexplicable. How could 20% of women voters suddenly turn toward her when Palin stands for erasing forty years of feminism? How could the mentality of a small-town mayor morph into a potential President making global decisions? To explain her meteoric rise, I offered the idea that each of us harbors a shadow, a place where our hidden impulses live. By appealing to fear, resentment, hostility to change, suspicion of "the other," and similar dark impulses, the Republicans have been the shadow's party for a long time. Sarah Palin put a smiling face on feelings that normally we feel ashamed of.

The shadow is irrational; it thrives on gut emotions. (A recent Fox News poll ran with the headline, "In their gut, independents choose McCain.") Bringing the 2008 campaign down to the gut level means bringing it down to the level of the shadow. Instead of listening to an intelligent, persuasive, charismatic man with one African-American parent, people get to say, "I just don't like blacks. They're scary; they're not like me. It's a gut thing." Only it's not. It's a shadow thing that each of us, not just the right wing, must deal with. Reacting to Palin with fear, confusion, panic, and lashing out also comes from the shadow.

People who were shocked and dismayed by the Palin effect generally don't know how to handle shadow energies. Here are a few salient points:

Don't panic - The shadow is built into your psyche, and when it brings fear, hostility, and resentment to the surface, those feelings want to get out. They cause disruption, but your panic only makes them stick around longer.

Try not to be overwhelmed - Eruptions from the shadow are transitory. If you don't encourage them, these energies dissipate naturally. If you are overwhelmed, however, the net result is exhaustion and loss of energy.

Remind yourself who you really are - You are much more than your shadow, because your aspirations, hopes, and dreams keep advancing despite the shadow's apparent power.  Pay the least attention to these disruptions as you need to calm down and no more.

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I disagree, Palin stands for everything woman real... by CW Blanchett on Friday, Sep 19, 2008 at 7:58:19 AM
From what I have read recently, the things you att... by Tony Duncan on Friday, Sep 19, 2008 at 2:17:57 PM
I dont know where you get your information from, b... by CW Blanchett on Friday, Sep 19, 2008 at 7:50:04 PM
Sarah represents traditional feminism fairly well.... by Bill Samuel on Friday, Sep 19, 2008 at 7:07:26 PM
Well, I get my info from progressive and conservat... by Tony Duncan on Sunday, Sep 21, 2008 at 4:41:41 AM