Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend 2 (2 Shares)  
Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites (# of views)   1 comment

Life Arts

New Orleans - Four Years and Counting: Talking with Larry Weiss

By   Follow Me on Twitter     Message Joan Brunwasser     Permalink
      (Page 1 of 2 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

View Ratings | Rate It Headlined to None 11/22/09

Become a Fan
  (83 fans)
- Advertisement -

I recently returned from a memorable volunteer trip to New Orleans. Larry Weiss is one of those responsible for putting it together. Weiss and David Goodman were the heart-and-brains behind bringing the first group of Northern New Jersey volunteers, back in 2006. Welcome to OpEdNews, Larry. Can you tell our readers about how that first trip came about?

It was about six months after Katrina; I was watching a report on the news about the storm aftermath and could not believe what the situation on the ground still was. I felt compelled to try and help beyond the donation that I had previously made. I contacted my local UJA [Jewish Federation] and told them that I wanted to organize a volunteer trip to the Gulf region. I was told that David Goodman had shown a similar interest and, since we knew each other, perhaps we should chat.

During our conversation, we realized that we had our own connections to New Orleans. David was a Tulane alum and my first job after college was in New Orleans. I lived there for about two years and it was during that time that I also got married. They city held many fond memories for me. It was where I was truly on my own for the first time in my life. Where I had my first "grown up" apartment and had a real job. I loved the food and the music. It was also a great place for two newlyweds with absolutely no money to enjoy free entertainment on just about every corner and where we could get a cup of coffee and split an order of beignets at Cafe' Du Monde for less than $3.00!

As David and I exchanged stories about life in the Deep South for two Jersey guys and all that went along with that experience both good and not so good, we decided to pursue our goal of bringing a group to the region to get dirty and to help. We put the idea out by word of mouth and, with the logistical support of our local Jewish Federation, we were able to attract a group of 17 volunteers.

The trip came together and we decided to spend three days there with several different groups. After we set the dates, we realized that we would be in New Orleans doing our service on the 5th anniversary on 9/11. Our plan was to have the group arrive on a Sunday morning. We would meet them at the airport and head out on a tour of the city and the area. Of course, we felt it would be best to arrive the day before to tie up loose ends and to take in what the city had to offer. I found out that The Rebirth Brass Band was playing their first show since Katrina at Tipitina's, a jazz venue in New Orleans. A homecoming that we had to attend and we did. After all, part of helping out also involves supporting the local economy!

We spent that first trip clearing yards, hauling trash, separating toxic from non-toxic debris, listening to stories, and providing comfort. We also spent one day in Biloxi and Gulfport, Mississippi, digging trenches in what was to be a new playground and community center. This activity took place on 9/11 and when word spread that a group of volunteers from the New York area were in town to help out, a local news crew came by and interviewed us for the nightly news. You know what Warhol said about everyone being famous for 15 minutes? Well, my 15 minutes came at a flooded-out playground in the sweltering heat of late summer in Gulfport and aired that night on WLOX.

painting bathroom at Camp Hope III, St. Bernard Parish, LA

- Advertisement -

After our return to JFK, David and I carpooled home. We didn't talk much on the ride. I think we were burned out, both by the physical as well as the emotional. As I dropped him off, David turned to me and simply said, "We did it!"

"Damn right, we did it," I replied. Little did I know it was just the beginning.

Shortly after we returned, word spread about our trip and we began to field inquiries about a return. When it appeared that we would have another group of about 26 volunteers, we put the wheels in motion again.

We have refined our model with each trip and have now brought almost 150 volunteers from North Jersey to New Orleans and the Gulf Region. We have worked with food pantries, community groups, dedicated a playground, helped to build a community center, painted houses, hung insulation, framed out the front of a house in the Musician's Village, nailed and taped sheetrock, laid flooring, mowed lawns, and cleared brush and trash, to name some of our accomplishments. We have heard stories and listened, we have consoled, comforted and hugged strangers and we have cried with them.

Insulating a home, St. Bernard Project, St. Bernard Parish, New Orleans

- Advertisement -

Our groups have consisted of men and women, teenagers, and seniors. Both those who are mechanically adept and those who are not safe to be around tools. What we have found in everyone is a desire to help and answer the call. It has been great and incredibly gratifying and now barely two weeks after our last trip, we are getting calls about trip #6!!!

I can attest to the enthusiasm and hard work that our contingent of 36 brought to this latest trip.

So glad that you were able to join us on our fifth Katrina re-building trip. After our first trip in September 2006, I wrote an essay about my experience and shared it with friends and anyone who was curious about what we saw and did. I go back to it before each subsequent trip as a barometer to gauge progress. What is remarkable is how much is still the same some four years later.

Tell us a little more about that, Larry.

What I still see is the monumental failure of the authorities and the indiscriminate fury of nature. However, I also still see the incredible resolve of those who are still there and of the thousands of volunteers who have stepped up to help total strangers.

When I've spoken to each group, I get them to think back to what they saw on TV. I also like to focus on what still amazes me and sometimes haunts my memory of what I have seen. It comes down to the absolute silence that one can find in what used to be thriving neighborhoods. That is why I ask them to walk to an intersection and look in all four directions; look and listen. No homes with cars in the driveway. No children. No birds. No noise.

Next Page  1  |  2


- Advertisement -

View Ratings | Rate It

Joan Brunwasser is a co-founder of Citizens for Election Reform (CER) which since 2005 existed for the sole purpose of raising the public awareness of the critical need for election reform. Our goal: to restore fair, accurate, transparent, secure elections where votes are cast in private and counted in public. Because the problems with electronic (computerized) voting systems include a lack of (more...)

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon

Go To Commenting

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Follow Me on Twitter

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
- Advertisement -

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Interview with Dr. Margaret Flowers, Arrested Tuesday at Senate Roundtable on Health Care

Renowned Stanford Psychologist Carol Dweck on "Mindset: The New Psychology of Success"

Howard Zinn on "The People Speak," the Supreme Court and Haiti

Fed Up With Corporate Tax Dodgers? Check Out!

Snopes confirms danger of Straight Ticket Voting (STV)

Literary Agent Shares Trade Secrets With New Writers