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Neocons to Americans: Trust Us Again

By       Message Robert Parry     Permalink
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Reprinted from Consortium News


President George W. Bush pauses for applause during his State of the Union Address on Jan. 28, 2003, when he made a fraudulent case for invading Iraq. Seated behind him are Vice President Dick Cheney and House Speaker Dennis Hastert.
(image by (White House photo))
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America's neocons insist that their only mistake was falling for some false intelligence about Iraq's WMD and that they shouldn't be stripped of their powerful positions of influence for just one little boo-boo. That's the point of view taken by Washington Post editorial page editor Fred Hiatt as he whines about the unfairness of applying "a single-interest litmus test," i.e., the Iraq War debacle, to judge him and his fellow war boosters.

After noting that many other important people were on the same pro-war bandwagon with him, Hiatt criticizes President Barack Obama for citing the Iraq War as an argument not to listen to many of the same neocons who now are trying to sabotage the Iran nuclear agreement. Hiatt thinks it's the height of unfairness for Obama or anyone else to suggest that people who want to kill the Iran deal -- and thus keep alive the option to bomb-bomb-bomb Iran -- "are lusting for another war."

Hiatt also faults Obama for not issuing a serious war threat to Iran, a missing ultimatum that explains why the nuclear agreement falls "so far short." Hiatt adds: "war is not always avoidable, and the judicious use of force early in a crisis, or even the threat of force, can sometimes forestall worse bloodshed later."

But it should be noted that the neocons -- and Hiatt in particular -- did not simply make one mistake when they joined President George W. Bush's rush to war in 2002-03. They continued with their warmongering in Iraq for years, often bashing the handful of brave souls in Official Washington who dared challenge the neocons' pro-war enthusiasm. Hiatt and his fellow "opinion leaders" were, in effect, the enforcers of the Iraq War "group think" -- and they have never sought to make amends for that bullying.

The Destruction of Joe Wilson

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Take, for instance, the case of CIA officer Valerie Plame and her husband, former U.S. Ambassador Joseph Wilson. Hiatt's editorial section waged a long vendetta against Wilson for challenging one particularly egregious lie, Bush's nationally televised claim about Iraq seeking "yellowcake" uranium from Niger, a suggestion that Iraq was working on a secret nuclear bomb. The Post's get-Wilson campaign included publishing a column that identified Plame as a CIA officer, thus destroying her undercover career.

At that point, you might have thought that Hiatt would have stepped forward and tried to ameliorate the harm that he and his editorial page had inflicted on this patriotic American family, whose offense was to point out a false claim that Bush had used to sell the Iraq War to the American people. But instead Hiatt simply piled on the abuse, essentially driving Wilson and Plame out of government circles and indeed out of Washington.

In effect, Hiatt applied a "a single-issue litmus test" to disqualify the Wilson family from the ranks of those Americans who should be listened to. Joe Wilson had failed the test by being right about the Iraq War, so he obviously needed to be drummed out of public life.

The fact that Hiatt remains the Post's editorial-page editor and that Wilson ended up decamping his family to New Mexico speaks volumes about the upside-down world that Official Washington has become. Be conspicuously, obstinately and nastily wrong about possibly the biggest foreign-policy blunder in U.S. history and you should be cut some slack, but dare be right and off with your head.

And the Iraq War wasn't just a minor error. In the dozen years since Bush launched his war of aggression in Iraq, the bloody folly has destabilized the entire Middle East, resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths (including nearly 4,500 U.S. soldiers), wasted well over $1 trillion, spread the grotesque violence of Sunni terrorism across the region, and sent a flood of refugees into Europe threatening the Continent's unity.

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Yet, what is perhaps most remarkable is that almost no one who aided and abetted the catastrophic and illegal decision has been held accountable in any meaningful way. That applies to Bush and his senior advisers who haven't spent a single day inside a jail cell; it applies to Official Washington's well-funded think tanks where neoconservatives still dominate; and it applies to the national news media where almost no one who disseminated pro-war propaganda was fired (with the possible exception of Judith Miller who was dumped by The New York Times but landed on her feet as a Fox News "on-air personality" and an op-ed contributor to The Wall Street Journal).

The Plame-Gate Affair

While the overall performance of the Post's editorial page during the Iraq War was one of the most shameful examples of journalistic malfeasance in modern U.S. history, arguably the ugliest part was the Post's years-long assault on Wilson and Plame. The so-called "Plame-gate Affair" began in early 2002 when the CIA recruited ex-Ambassador Wilson to investigate what turned out to be a forged document indicating a possible Iraqi yellowcake purchase in Niger. The document had aroused Vice President Dick Cheney's interest.

Having served in Africa, Wilson accepted the CIA's assignment and returned with a conclusion that Iraq had almost surely not obtained any uranium from Niger, an assessment shared by other U.S. officials who checked out the story. However, the bogus allegation was not so easily quashed.

Wilson was stunned when Bush included the Niger allegations in his State of the Union Address in January 2003. Initially, Wilson began alerting a few journalists about the discredited claim while trying to keep his name out of the newspapers. However, in July 2003 -- after the U.S. invasion in March 2003 had failed to turn up any WMD stockpiles -- Wilson penned an op-ed article for The New York Times describing what he didn't find in Africa and saying the White House had "twisted" pre-war intelligence.

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http://www.consortiumnews.com

Robert Parry broke many of the Iran-Contra stories in the 1980s for the Associated Press and Newsweek. His latest book, Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq, can be ordered at secrecyandprivilege.com. It's also available at
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