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How the Republican Tempest Over the Affordable Care Act Diverts Attention from Three Large Truths

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Source: Robert Reich Blog


The "Affordable Care Act," the measure to expand health insurance for millions of Americans is considered Obama's signature domestic policy achievement.
(image by Vicksburg Daily News)


Having failed to defeat the Affordable Care Act in Congress, to beat it back in the last election, to repeal it despite more than 80 votes in the House, to stop it in the federal courts, to get enough votes in the Supreme Court to overrule it, and to gut it with outright extortion (closing the government and threatening to default on the nation's debts unless it was repealed), Republicans are now down to their last ploy.

They are hell-bent on destroying the Affordable Care Act in Americans' minds.

A document circulating among House Republicans (reported by the New York Times) instructs them to repeat the following themes and stories continuously: "Because of Obamacare, I Lost My Insurance." "Obamacare Increases Health Care Costs." "The Exchanges May Not Be Secure, Putting Personal Information at Risk."

Every Republican in Washington has been programmed to use the word "disaster" whenever mentioning the Act, always refer to it as Obamacare, and demand its repeal.

Republican wordsmiths know they can count on Fox News and right-wing yell radio to amplify and intensify all of this in continuous loops of elaboration and outrage, repeated so often as to infect peoples' minds like purulent pustules.

The idea is to make the Act so detestable it becomes the fearsome centerpiece of the midterm elections of 2014 -- putting enough Democrats on the defensive they join in seeking its repeal or at least in amending it in ways that gut it (such as allowing insurers to sell whatever policies they want as long as they want, or delaying it further).

Admittedly, the President provided Republicans ammunition by botching the Act's roll-out. Why wasn't HealthCare.gov up and running smoothly October 1? Partly because the Administration didn't anticipate that almost every Republican governor would refuse to set up a state exchange, thereby loading even more responsibility on an already over-worked and underfunded Department of Health and Human Services.

Why didn't Obama's advisors anticipate that some policies would be cancelled (after all, the Act sets higher standards than many policies offered) and therefore his "you can keep their old insurance" promise would become a target? Likely because they knew all policies were "grandfathered" for a year, didn't anticipate how many insurers would cancel right away, and understood that only 5 percent of policyholders received insurance independent of an employer anyway.

But there's really no good excuse. The White House should have anticipated the Republican attack machine.

The real problem is now. The President and other Democrats aren't meeting the Republican barrage with three larger truths that show the pettiness of the attack:

The wreck of private insurance.  Ours has been the only healthcare system in the world designed to avoid sick people. For-profit insurers have spent billions finding and marketing their policies to healthy people -- young adults, people at low risk of expensive diseases, groups of professionals -- while rejecting people with preexisting conditions, otherwise debilitated, or at high risk of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. And have routinely dropped coverage of policy holders who become seriously sick or disabled. What else would you expect from corporations seeking to maximize profits?

But the social consequences have been devastating. We have ended up with the most expensive healthcare system in the world (finding and marketing to healthy people is expensive, corporate executives are expensive, profits adequate to satisfy shareholders are expensive), combined with the worst health outcomes of all rich countries -- highest rates of infant mortality, shortest life spans, largest portions of populations never seeing a doctor and receiving no preventive care, most expensive uses of emergency rooms.

We could not and cannot continue with this travesty of a healthcare system.

The Affordable Care Act is a modest solution. It still relies on private insurers -- merely setting minimum standards and "exchanges" where customers can compare policies, requiring insurers to take people with preexisting conditions and not abandon those who get seriously sick, and helping low-income people afford coverage.

A single-payer system would have been preferable. Most other rich countries do it this way. It could have been grafted on to Social Security and Medicare, paid for through payroll taxes, expanded to lower-income families through Medicaid. It would have been simple and efficient. (It's no coincidence that the Act's Medicaid expansion has been easy and rapid in states that chose to accept it.)

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http://robertreich.org/

Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new film, "Inequality for All," to be released September 27. He blogs at www.robertreich.org.

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Hi Professor Reich - You make some excellent point... by manifesto 2000 on Saturday, Nov 23, 2013 at 2:15:00 PM
Rethugs and dims - 2 sides to the same rotten to t... by Poor old Dirt farmer on Saturday, Nov 23, 2013 at 4:55:59 PM
"The other day I heard a young man say he'd rather... by John Rachel on Saturday, Nov 23, 2013 at 6:38:11 PM
Let me restate that young mans words: "Why sh... by ax 123man on Sunday, Nov 24, 2013 at 7:53:05 AM
Nice circular reasoning,let the companies who have... by kappie on Sunday, Nov 24, 2013 at 9:29:19 AM
How the Democratic Defense of the Affordable Care... by PCM on Sunday, Nov 24, 2013 at 3:47:26 PM