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First "Ag-Gag" Prosecution: This Utah Woman Filmed a Slaughterhouse from the Public Street

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opednews.com Headlined to H1 4/29/13

reprinted from greenisthenewred.com

From http://www.flickr.com/photos/33437095@N08/8693552280/: Do not take my cows

Amy Meyer wanted to see the slaughterhouse for herself. She had heard that anyone passing by could view the animals, so she drove to Dale Smith Me atpacking Company in Draper City, Utah, and from the side of the road she could see through the barbed-wire fence. Piles of horns littered the property. Cows struggled with workers who tried to lead them into a building. And one scene in particular made her stop.

"A live cow who appeared to be sick or injured being carried away from the building in a tractor," Meyer told me, "as though she were nothing more than rubble."

As she witnessed this, Meyer did what most of us would in the age of smart phones and YouTube: she recorded.

When the slaughterhouse manager came outside and told her to stop, she replied that she was on the public easement and had the right to film. When police arrived, she said told them the same thing. According to the police report, the manager said she was trespassing and crossed over the barbed-wire fence, but the officer noted "there was no damage to the fence in my observation."

 

Meyer was allowed to leave. She later found out she was being prosecuted under the state's new "ag-gag" law.  

This is the first prosecution in the country under one of these laws, which are designed to silence undercover investigators who expose animal welfare abuses on factory farms. The legislation is a direct response to a series of shocking investigations by groups like the Humane Society, Mercy for Animals, and Compassion Over Killing that have led to plant closures, public outrage, and criminal charges against workers.

Even the most sweeping ag-gag bills, such as the American Legislative Exchange Council model legislation, don't explicitly target filming from a roadside. But Nebraska, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Vermont are all considering bills similar to the Utah law right now.

Pennsylvania's bill criminalizes anyone who "records an image of, or sound from, the agricultural operation" or who "uploads, downloads, transfers or otherwise sends" the footage using the Internet.

North Carolina's bill doesn't specifically mention factory farms or slaughterhouses: it is called the "Commerce Protection Act," and it includes investigations of any industry. It was introduced on the same day a fifth employee of Butterball pleaded guilty to animal cruelty after an undercover investigation showed workers beating turkeys.

Tennessee's bill has already passed and is awaiting signature from the governor. In response to calls for a veto from the Humane Society and Carrie Underwood, one state representative compared undercover investigations to rape and sex-trafficking.

California's ag-gag bill recently failed, after a massive public backlash. One newspaper editorial said "the cattlemen have committed the worst PR gaffe since New Coke." The bill was a response to an undercover investigation by the Humane Society that showed "downer" cows, too sick to move, being pushed by tractors (much like what Amy Meyer recorded in Utah). It led to the largest meat recall in U.S. history.

The public backlash against these bills, including recent editorials by the New York Times  and Washington Post, has relied on hypothetical examples of how they could be used. The AFL-CIO and Teamsters say they could put workers at risk. The ASPCA says they could shut down lawful investigations by animal-protection groups. The National Press Photographers Association says they could wrap up journalists.

The first ag-gag prosecution should be a warning that these aren't hypothetical concerns. These bills have one purpose: keep consumers in the dark. Rather than respond to video footage of animal cruelty with across-the-board reforms, the industry is trying to turn off the cameras.


In Utah, the bill's sponsor, Rep. John Mathis, called undercover investigators "animal rights terrorists" and said video recordings of animal abuse are "propaganda." In his opening remarks at a legislative hearing on the ag-gag bill, Mathis said: "It's fun to see my good ag friends in this committee" and "all my good friends are here." Ag-gag supporters couldn't be any more transparent in their financial motivations for censorship. It's telling that the owner of the slaughterhouse Amy Meyer filmed happens to be Darrell H. Smith, the town mayor. (Mayor Smith, the meatpacking company, and the local prosecutor did not return phone calls for comment). If that's shocking to you, it shouldn't be. In Iowa, for example, the nation's first ag-gag law was sponsored by Rep. Annette Sweeney, who is the former director of the Iowa Angus Association.

It was prescient that, as the Utah bill was being considered, the Utah Sentencing Commission warned that it could be used against anyone who merely takes a photograph of a farm or slaughterhouse. At the time, Rep. Greg Hughes of Draper replied: "Who would really pursue that in terms of prosecution?" Now, the first ag-gag prosecution is for precisely that, in his own district.

Most people won't ever find themselves in the position of Amy Meyer, of course. Few of us actively seek out information about how our food is produced. (Do you know the location of a factory farm, if you wanted to?) The animal products just arrive at the supermarket, without investigation or thought.


Most importantly, ag-gag bills are about you -- the millions of Americans who might see this footage, be sickened by it, and demand a change. With ag-gag bills, the industry is trying to keep it that way. These bills are not just about animal activists from national organizations going undercover. They are about people like Amy Meyer, who have seen how animals are being treated, and who want you to see what they have seen.  

Images of the plant and cows going to slaughter are available at the Dale Smith website.  

Will Potter is the author of Green Is the New Red: An Insider's Account of a Social Movement Under Siege (City Lights, 2011).

Concerned about ag-gag laws? Join the 40,000+ others who have signed the petition at  Change.org/AgGag

 

http://www.GreenIsTheNewRed.com

Will Potter is an award-winning reporter who focuses on how lawmakers and corporations have labeled animal rights and environmental activists as "eco-terrorists." Will has written for publications including The Chicago Tribune, The Dallas Morning News and Legal Affairs, and has testified (more...)
 

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How can we join the efforts to stop these.. &... by Don Caldarazzo on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 8:55:30 AM
Fight Ag Gag laws, which criminalize the needed kn... by Joe Leeson-Schatz on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 9:42:39 AM
unconstitutional?... by BFalcon on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 11:05:58 AM
Since when did governments obey the law, including... by Richard Pietrasz on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 4:02:18 PM
The laws will be thrown out, even if the cases go ... by Daniel Vasey on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 6:47:40 PM
Speaking the truth won't always get you sued. Some... by Simon Leigh on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 11:06:15 AM
When I read things like this - elected officials b... by Suzana Megles on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 11:39:32 AM
As the US enterprise inc continues under the elect... by Andrew Ess on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 12:19:52 PM
Everyone who is offended by can protest this SO EA... by mrk * on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 12:42:14 PM
seeing a documentary concerning the ag-gag rule. I... by dorothy przystas on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 1:41:16 PM
...as I suspect the cow mentioned above was in bad... by Jill Herendeen on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 2:10:52 PM
can you image what this industry will be like afte... by Icthelite on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 6:38:49 PM
Evil exists in the shadows. Veiling is a tale tell... by Textynn N on Tuesday, Apr 30, 2013 at 11:37:20 PM
Commerce Protection Act! Monsanto Protection Act... by Michael Daly, artist on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 2:42:42 PM
Where is the 1st amendment in all of this?... by kitty mitchell on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 4:54:10 PM