Add this Page to Facebook!   Submit to Twitter   Submit to Reddit   Submit to Stumble Upon   Pin It!   Fark It!   Tell A Friend  
Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite Save As Favorite View Article Stats
7 comments

OpEdNews Op Eds

Extremism Normalized

By (about the author)     Permalink       (Page 1 of 2 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

Must Read 4   Supported 3   Well Said 2  
View Ratings | Rate It

Headlined to None 8/1/12
Become a Fan
  (107 fans)

opednews.com

How Americans are efficiently trained to acquiesce to ideas once deemed so radical as to be unthinkable


Remember when, in the wake of the 9/11 attack, the Patriot Act was controversial, held up as the symbolic face of Bush/Cheney radicalism and widely lamented as a threat to core American liberties and restraints on federal surveillance and detention powers? Yet now, the Patriot Act is quietly renewed every four years by overwhelming majorities in both parties (despite substantial evidence of serious abuse), and almost nobody is bothered by it any longer. That's how extremist powers become normalized: they just become such a fixture in our political culture that we are trained to take them for granted, to view the warped as normal. Here are several examples from the last couple of days illustrating that same dynamic; none seems overwhelmingly significant on its own, but that's the point:

After Dick Cheney criticized John McCain this weekend for having chosen Sarah Palin as his running mate, this was McCain's retort:

"Look, I respect the vice president. He and I had strong disagreements as to whether we should torture people or not. I don't think we should have."

Isn't it amazing that the first sentence there ("I respect the vice president") can precede the next one ("He and I had strong disagreements as to whether we should torture people or not") without any notice or controversy? I realize insincere expressions of respect are rote ritualism among American political elites, but still, McCain's statement amounts to this pronouncement: Dick Cheney authorized torture -- he is a torturer -- and I respect him. How can that be an acceptable sentiment to express? Of course, it's even more notable that political officials whom everyone knows authorized torture are walking around free, respected and prosperous, completely shielded from all criminal accountability. "Torture" has been permanently transformed from an unspeakable taboo into a garden-variety political controversy, where it shall long remain.

Equally remarkable is this Op-Ed from The Los Angeles Times over the weekend, condemning President Obama's kill lists and secret assassinations:

"Allowing the president of the United States to act as judge, jury and executioner for suspected terrorists, including U.S. citizens, on the basis of secret evidence is impossible to reconcile with the Constitution's guarantee that a life will not be taken without due process of law.

"Under the law, the government must obtain a court order if it seeks to target a U.S. citizen for electronic surveillance, yet there is no comparable judicial review of a decision to kill a citizen. No court is even able to review the general policies for such assassinations. . . .

"But if the United States is going to continue down the troubling road of state-sponsored assassination, Congress should, at the very least, require that a court play some role, as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court does with the electronic surveillance of suspected foreign terrorists. Even minimal judicial oversight might make the president and his advisors think twice about whether an American citizen poses such an "imminent" danger that he must be executed without a trial."

Isn't it amazing that a newspaper editorial even has to say: you know, the President isn't really supposed to have the power to act as judge, jury and executioner and order American citizens assassinated with no transparency or due process? And isn't it even more amazing that the current President has actually seized and exercised this power with very little controversy? Recall that when The New York Times first confirmed Obama's targeting of citizens for assassinations in 2010, it noted, citing "officials," that "it is extremely rare, if not unprecedented, for an American to be approved for targeted killing." No longer. That presidential power -- literally the most tyrannical power a political leader can seize -- is also now a barely noticed fixture of our political culture.

Meanwhile, we have this, from the Associated Press yesterday:

Remember when John Poindexter's "Total Information Awareness" program -- which was "to use data mining technologies to sift through personal transactions in electronic data to find patterns and associations connected to terrorist threats and activities": basically create real-time surveillance of everyone -- was too extreme and menacing even for an America still at its peak of post-9/11 hysteria? Yet here we have the NYPD -- more than a decade removed from 9/11 -- announcing a very similar program in very similar terms, and it's almost impossible to envision any real controversy.

Similarly, in the AP's sentence above describing the supposed targets of this new NYPD surveillance program: what, exactly, is a "potential terrorist"? Isn't that an incredibly Orwellian term given that, by definition, it can include anyone and everyone? In practice, it will almost certainly mean: all Muslims, plus anyone who engages in any activism that opposes prevailing power factions. That's how the American Surveillance State is always used. Still, the undesirability of mass, "all-seeing," indiscriminate surveillance regime was a given -- a view, in sum, that the East German Stasi was a bad idea that we would not want to replicate on American soil -- yet now, there is almost no limit on the level of state surveillance we tolerate.

In The New York Times yesterday, Elisabeth Bumiller wrote about the very moving and burdensome plight of America's drone pilots who, sitting in front of a "computer console [] in the Syracuse suburbs," extinguish people's lives thousands of miles away by launching missiles at them. The bulk of the article is devoted to eliciting sympathy and admiration for these noble warriors, but when doing so, she unwittingly describes America's future with domestic surveillance drones:

"Among the toughest psychological tasks is the close surveillance for aerial sniper missions, reminiscent of the East German Stasi officer absorbed by the people he spies on in the movie 'The Lives of Others.' A drone pilot and his partner, a sensor operator who manipulates the aircraft's camera, observe the habits of a militant as he plays with his children, talks to his wife and visits his neighbors. They then try to time their strike when, for example, his family is out at the market.

"'They watch this guy do bad things and then his regular old life things,' said Col. Hernando Ortega, the chief of aerospace medicine for the Air Education Training Command, who helped conduct a study last year on the stresses on drone pilots. . . . 'You see them wake up in the morning, do their work, go to sleep at night,' said Dave, an Air Force major who flew drones from 2007 to 2009 at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada and now trains drone pilots at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico."

Next Page  1  |  2

 

For the past 10 years, I was a litigator in NYC specializing in First Amendment challenges, civil rights cases, and corporate and securities fraud matters. I am the author of the New York Times Best-Selling book, How Would A Patriot (more...)
 
Add this Page to Facebook!   Submit to Twitter   Submit to Reddit   Submit to Stumble Upon   Pin It!   Fark It!   Tell A Friend
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact Author Contact Editor View Authors' Articles

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

HSBC, too big to jail, is the new poster child for US two-tiered justice system

US investigates possible WikiLeaks leaker for "communicating with the enemy"

Prosecution of Anonymous activists highlights war for Internet control

The myth of Obama's "blunders" and "weakness"

Are All Telephone Calls Recorded And Accessible To The US Government?

The Remarkable, Unfathomable Ignorance of Debbie Wasserman Schultz

Comments

The time limit for entering new comments on this article has expired.

This limit can be removed. Our paid membership program is designed to give you many benefits, such as removing this time limit. To learn more, please click here.

Comments: Expand   Shrink   Hide  
7 people are discussing this page, with 7 comments
To view all comments:
Expand Comments
(Or you can set your preferences to show all comments, always)

I oppose. I have stopped paying federal income tax... by Christopher Toussaint on Thursday, Aug 2, 2012 at 11:52:50 AM
I questioned myself during the last election as to... by Stevethinks on Thursday, Aug 2, 2012 at 12:12:50 PM
Why it is so very important that Obama have a 2nd ... by Miriam Callaghan on Thursday, Aug 2, 2012 at 3:49:30 PM
took over when JFK was assassinated. Their lock on... by intotheabyss on Thursday, Aug 2, 2012 at 4:08:09 PM
" There is  zero question  that this d... by BFalcon on Thursday, Aug 2, 2012 at 11:20:18 PM
Glenn goes on and on about 'How Americans are effi... by 911TRUTH on Friday, Aug 3, 2012 at 12:49:00 AM
The Nuremberg War Crimes Trials were shocking, rev... by Lance Ciepiela on Friday, Aug 3, 2012 at 2:15:17 AM