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Engelhardt, A Record of Unparalleled Failure

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This article originally appeared at TomDispatch.com. To receive TomDispatch in your inbox three times a week, click here.

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By the way, one summer reading recommendation tied to today's piece: don't miss TomDispatch author Beverly Gologorsky's Stop Here, a powerful working class novel about the effects on this country of its endless, distant wars. It's riveting! Tom]

Don't Walk Away from War It's Not the American Way By Tom Engelhardt

The United States has been at war -- major boots-on-the-ground conflicts and minor interventions, firefights, air strikes, drone assassination campaigns, occupations, special ops raids, proxy conflicts, and covert actions -- nearly nonstop since the Vietnam War began. That's more than half a century of experience with war, American-style, and yet few in our world bother to draw the obvious conclusions.

Given the historical record, those conclusions should be staring us in the face. They are, however, the words that can't be said in a country committed to a military-first approach to the world, a continual build-up of its forces, an emphasis on pioneering work in the development and deployment of the latest destructive technology, and a repetitious cycling through styles of war from full-scale invasions and occupations to counterinsurgency, proxy wars, and back again.

So here are five straightforward lessons -- none acceptable in what passes for discussion and debate in this country -- that could be drawn from that last half century of every kind of American warfare:

1. No matter how you define American-style war or its goals, it doesn't work. Ever.

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2. No matter how you pose the problems of our world, it doesn't solve them. Never.

3. No matter how often you cite the use of military force to "stabilize" or "protect" or "liberate" countries or regions, it is a destabilizing force.

4. No matter how regularly you praise the American way of war and its "warriors," the U.S. military is incapable of winning its wars.

5. No matter how often American presidents claim that the U.S. military is "the finest fighting force in history," the evidence is in: it isn't.

And here's a bonus lesson: if as a polity we were to take these five no-brainers to heart and stop fighting endless wars, which drain us of national treasure, we would also have a long-term solution to the Veterans Administration health-care crisis. It's not the sort of thing said in our world, but the VA is in a crisis of financing and caregiving that, in the present context, cannot be solved, no matter whom you hire or fire. The only long-term solution would be to stop fighting losing wars that the American people will pay for decades into the future, as the cost in broken bodies and broken lives is translated into medical care and dumped on the VA.

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Heroes and Turncoats

One caveat. Think whatever you want about war and American war-making, but keep in mind that we are inside an enormous propaganda machine of militarism, even if we barely acknowledge the space in our lives that it fills. Inside it, only certain opinions, certain thoughts, are acceptable, or even in some sense possible.

Take for an example the recent freeing of Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl from five years as a captive of the Haqqani network. Much controversy has surrounded it, in part because he was traded for five former Taliban officials long kept uncharged and untried on the American Devil's Island at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. It has been suggested that Sgt. Bergdahl deserted his post and his unit in rural Afghanistan, simply walked away -- which for opponents of the deal and of President Obama makes the "trade for terrorists" all the more shameful. Our options when it comes to what we know of Bergdahl's actions are essentially to decry him as a "turncoat" or near-voluntary "terrorist prisoner" or ignore them, go into a "support the troops" mode, and hail him as a "hero" of the war. And yet there is a third option.

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Tom Engelhardt, who runs the Nation Institute's Tomdispatch.com ("a regular antidote to the mainstream media"), is the co-founder of the American Empire Project and, most recently, the author of Mission Unaccomplished: Tomdispatch Interviews (more...)
 

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Shucks, Tom, you're looking at it all backward. I... by Jill Herendeen on Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014 at 8:18:31 PM
Absolutely RIGHT __ The oil-military industry lead... by urb musak on Thursday, Jun 12, 2014 at 4:04:42 PM