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Sci Tech

Disaster Waiting to Happen at Indian Point

By       Message Karl Grossman     Permalink
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From Indian Point
Indian Point
(image by Wikipedia (

In 1976, Robert Pollard, a rarity among U.S. government nuclear officials--honest and safety-committed--said of the Indian Point nuclear power station that it was "an accident waiting to happen."

Pollard had been project manager at Indian Point for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) from which he resigned at that time charging the NRC "suppresses the existence of unresolved safety questions and fails to resolve these problems." He joined the Union of Concerned Scientists.

An explosion and fire at a transformer at Indian Point 3 on Saturday is but one of the many accidents that have occurred at the Indian Point facility through the years--none catastrophic as have been the disasters at the Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants.

But Indian Point 2 has been in operation for 41 years, although when nuclear power was first advanced in the United States, plants were never seen as running for more than 40 years because of radioactivity embrittling metal parts and otherwise causing safety problems. So licenses were limited to 40 years.

Indian Point 2 is thus now running without an operating license while the NRC considers an application before it from the plant's owner, Entergy, to allow it to run another 20 years--for 60 years.

Indian Point 3, where the transformer explosion and fire occurred, has been operational for 39 years and its license expires this year. (Indian Point l was shut down early because of mechanical deficiencies.) Entergy also is seeking to have Indian Point 3's operating license extended to 60 years.

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These old, long problem-plagued nuclear plants, 26 miles up the Hudson River from New York City, are now disasters waiting to happen in a very heavily populated area. Some 22 million people live within 50 miles of the Indian Point site.

"This plant is the nuclear plant that is closest to the most densely populated area on the globe," declared New York Governor Andrew Cuomo at the Indian Point site on Sunday. Cuomo, who has been pushing to have the Indian Point nuclear plants closed, noted that this was "not the first transformer fire" at them. And the concern is that "one situation is going to trigger another."

Entergy PR people in recent days have stressed that the transformer explosion and fire occurred in the "non-nuclear part" of Indian Point 3. However, as Pollard noted in a television documentary, "Three Mile Island Revisited," that I wrote and narrated on that accident, "there is no non-nuclear part of a nuclear plant."

What could be the extent of a major accident at Indian Point?

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1982 issued a report titled "Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences" or CRAC-2. The research for the report was done at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico.

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CRAC-2--you can read the full report online at

--projects that in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident with breach of containment at Indian Point 2, there could be 46,000 "peak early fatalities," 141,000 "peak early injuries," 13,000 "cancer deaths" and a cost in property damages (in 1980 dollars) of $274 billion (which in today's dollars would be $1 trillion)

For an accident at Indian Point 3 in which the transformer explosion and fire happened, because it is a somewhat bigger reactor (generating 1,025 megawatts compared to Indian Point 2's 1,020) the impacts would be greater, said CRAC-2

For Indian Point 3, in the event of a meltdown with breach of containment, CRAC-2 estimates 50,000 "peak early fatalities," 167,000 "peak early injuries," 14,000 "cancer deaths" and a cost in property damage at $314 billion.

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Karl Grossman is a professor of journalism at the State University of New York/College at Old Westbury and host of the nationally syndicated TV program Enviro Close-Up.

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