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Corporate Welfare In California

By       Message Robert B. Reich     Permalink
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Reprinted from Robert Reich Blog

Corporate welfare is often camouflaged in taxes that seem neutral on their face but give windfalls to big entrenched corporations at the expense of average people and small businesses.

Take a look at commercial property taxes in California, for example.

In 1978 California voters passed Proposition 13 -- which began to assess property for tax purposes at its price when it was bought, rather than its current market price.

This has protected homeowners and renters. But it's also given a quiet windfall to entrenched corporate owners of commercial property.

Corporations don't need this protection. They're in the real economy. They're supposed to compete on a level playing field with new companies whose property taxes are based on current market prices.

This corporate windfall has caused three big problems.

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First, it's shifted more of the property tax on to California homeowners.

Back in 1978, corporations paid 44 percent of all property taxes and homeowners paid 56 percent. Now, after exploiting this loophole for years, corporations pay only 28 percent of property taxes, while homeowners pick up 72 percent of the tab.

Second, it's robbed California of billions of dollars to support schools and local services. If all corporations were paying the property taxes they should be paying, schools and local services would have $9 billion dollars more in revenues this year.

Third, it penalizes new and expanding businesses that don't get this windfall because their commercial property is assessed at the current market price -- but they compete for customers with companies whose property is assessed at the price they purchased it years ago.

That's unfair and it's bad for the economy because California needs new and expanding businesses.

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Today, almost half of all commercial properties in California pay their fair share of property taxes, but they're hobbled by those that don't.

This loophole must be closed. All corporations should be paying commercial property taxes based on current market prices.

The giant corporations that are currently exploiting the loophole for their own profits obviously don't want it closed, so they're trying to scare people by saying closing it will cause businesses to leave California.

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http://robertreich.org/

Robert Reich, former U.S. Secretary of Labor and Professor of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley, has a new film, "Inequality for All," to be released September 27. He blogs at www.robertreich.org.


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