Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 2 Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend (2 Shares)  
Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites View Stats   1 comment

OpEdNews Op Eds

"Cablegate" Raises Question: How Does a Superpower Dominate?

By (about the author)     Permalink       (Page 1 of 1 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H2 11/29/10

Become a Fan
  (10 fans)

"Cablegate," the huge leak of U.S. Embassy cables from 1966 to this year, began coming from Wikileaks.org Sunday. This ongoing project, building on the leaks from earlier this year about the U.S. occupations of Iraq and Afghanistan, is huge not only for the amount of information released, but for its import. I suspect we won't know that fully until we have a chance to dig into more. Wikileaks has helpfully organized the search by country, date, and topic.

What does the leak reveal? More than just one administration's practices; more than dirty tricks, individual opinions, "rogue" spies and diplomats, what I've seen already confirms a pattern, a system, of an un-checked superpower conducting "business as usual" behind secrecy, using diplomacy as yet another weapon.

Der Spiegel described it as "a political meltdown for American foreign policy" that leaves "the trust America's partners have in the country "badly shaken." USA Today reports Hillary Clinton...

"...condemned the WikiLeaks release of once-classified diplomatic documents as nothing less than an attack on the United States and its allies."

Private individuals are entitled to privacy, despite the actions of the Bush and Obama administrations, and governments may be entitled to secrecy. But everything from "dirty tricks" ala Dick Nixon to CIA assasinations are crimes by governments, and should be exposed.

Once again, we owe a debt to Wikileaks and the source of the leaks, for providing us the basis to see behind the lies. PFC Bradley Manning is charged with these leaks, and sits in military prison at Quantico VA, awaiting a court martial. It is up to us to defend Manning, and do good with the revelations, by acting to stop the crimes through visible, vocal, public protest, just what World Can't Wait exists for.

But the pro-war Congress leader Peter King wants Julian Assange tried for espionage as a "terrorist." Harold Koh, the State Department legal counsel who defends the Obama administration's targeted assassination as compatible with international law, says the leaks will...

"...place at risk the lives of countless innocent individuals," and "place at risk on-going military operations."

Nancy A. Youssef, in Officials may be overstating the danger from WikiLeaks, challenges that assertion.

"American officials in recent days have warned repeatedly that the release of documents by WikiLeaks could put people's lives in danger. But despite similar warnings ahead of the previous two massive releases of classified U.S. intelligence reports by the website, U.S. officials concede that they have no evidence to date that the documents led to anyone's death."

Glenn Greenwald wrote earlier today on damage to civilians,

"Many of the same people who supported the invasion of Iraq and/or who support the war in Afghanistan, drone strikes and assassination programs -- on the ground that the massive civilians deaths which result are justifiable "collateral damage" -- are those objecting most vehemently to WikiLeaks' disclosure on the ground that it may lead to the death of innocent people. For them, the moral framework suddenly becomes that if an act causes the deaths of any innocent person, that is proof that it is not only unjustifiable but morally repellent regardless of what it achieves. How glaringly selective is their alleged belief in that moral framework."

The danger to civilians is in being militarily occupied, economically controlled and dominated by an unchecked superpower. Everything we can do to rouse people living in the United States to act to end these occupations is needed, now!

worldcantwait.net will be covering the ongoing revelations.

Wednesday December 1: 2pm EST/11 am PST

Live From Frontline Club, London, a webcast on Wikileaks: The U.S. Embassy Cables

Following the release this weekend of 251,287 confidential United States embassy cables, this month's First Wednesday debate will focus on the revelations of this latest leak from whistle-blower website WikiLeaks. We will be joined by: WikiLeaks spokesperson Kristinn Hrafnsson; James Ball a data journalist who has been working with WikiLeaks; Nicky Hager, author and Investigative journalist; Additional panelists to be confirmed.

 

http://www.worldcantwait.net

Debra Sweet is the Director of World Can't Wait, initiated in 2005 to "drive out the Bush regime" by repudiating its program, forcing it from office through a mass, independent movement and reversing the direction it had launched. Based in New York City, she leads World Can't Wait in its continuing efforts to stop the crimes of our government, including the unjust occupations of Iraq and Afghanistan and the torture and detention codes, as well as reversing the fascist direction of U.S. society, from the surveillance state to the (more...)
 

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon

Go To Commenting
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Follow Me on Twitter

Contact Author Contact Editor View Authors' Articles

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

12 Steps to Overcoming Addiction to Voting for the "Lesser of 2 Evils"

Call to Action: March 17-19 Iraq War Protests

Obama Wants U.S. "Comfortable" with Vast Surveillance

War Criminals to Meet in Chicago, But Somehow Protest Will be the Danger?

Nakedness, Justice and Bradley Manning

This is no "Humanitarian Intervention" in Libya

Comments

The time limit for entering new comments on this article has expired.

This limit can be removed. Our paid membership program is designed to give you many benefits, such as removing this time limit. To learn more, please click here.

Comments: Expand   Shrink   Hide  
1 people are discussing this page, with 1 comments
To view all comments:
Expand Comments
(Or you can set your preferences to show all comments, always)

Wikileaks' sheer volume notwithstanding, it has an... by Clark on Tuesday, Nov 30, 2010 at 2:12:40 PM