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American Platitudes on Democracy and Human Rights- an Exercise in Vacuousness

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[I am posting this short response that I sent to Paul Craig Roberts for an excellent article by that sensitive and perceptive commentator, satirically titled Who Will Liberate America, that appeared in Counterpunch on February 15, 2012. As I indicate in my note, this article and its predecessor, titled The Divine Right of Money, are exceedingly well-written in terms of the truth behind the American corporate state, and its imprisonment of all domains of ideas or human idealism, and should be must-reads for all that wish to see through the facade of American hypocrisy that now exceeds all measures of vacuousness. The points that Dr. Roberts makes, including waging war, violating international conventions for decent and civilized behavior, systematic and never-ending killing of civilians in a great many countries, invasion and occupation of sovereign nations, the distinction of being the country that holds the largest number of its own citizens prisoners, making a complete mockery of the United Nations by defying international opinions on any and all issues that are contrary to its and Israel's actions, and many others are all apt, right-on and indeed poignant. I hope some of the OpEd News readers will follow the URLs to read Dr. Roberts' articles. MRC]

Dear Dr. Roberts:

I have been a reader of your most thoughtful and humane essays for several years now. During the dark, grotesque and murderous years of GWB and his soulless minions, essays by you and other humanitarian columnists kept me (and I am sure so many others) sane and hopeful. This note is prompted by your magnificent essay in today's Counterpunch (URL: click here ).

Indeed, Washington's terrorism, arrogance and criminality know absolutely no bounds. Its history has always been at best checkered; however, from the time of Ronald Reagan (the one-liner expert that so many worshipped and still do), its unimpeded crime-spree has become rampant, unchallenged, and without any end. It is ironic that you were likely once in the employ of this unpunished criminal establishment (I gather this from your resume). The very fact that you speak out so strongly and persuasively about Washington's crimes, should make you not only one of the most well-qualified insider and interpreter of this criminal enterprise (not counting other stalwarts such as Bill Moyers, Ramsey Clark or John Dean), it should also make your observations a must-read for all literate, awakened and conscious human beings possessed of any common humanity.

To think that the current WH occupant was greeted with a Nobel Peace Prize by a European establishment (Europe and Washington, after all, have been, and continue to be, partners in countless crimes around the world) is an irony and tragedy beyond deafening in its cruel bombast; it is ear-splitting in its unheard sounds of Western mockery of human values.

Since the U.S. invasion of Iraq and other places of the world in 2003- this country in my eyes remains of the most flagrant terrorist nations in the world, and its shamelessness (as you correctly point out) in even raising the issue of human rights before other countries and world leaders) is mind boggling.

To ever even begin to clean its Augean stables of horrific international crimes of immeasurable proportions, the U.S. could begin by bringing its galaxy of war criminals to trial before humanity; admit before the world the sheer inhumanity of its "bringing democracy to people" (by bombing, shooting, and droning them to freedom, as you aptly describe in so many of your essays); vow never again to set upon ghastly and profit-driven imperial campaigns; eschew its frightfully hypocritical pretenses of piety; and offer compensation worldwide to the victims of its never-ending crimes.

Of course, I do not see any component of the above wish-list coming true. This is much like the Divine Right of Money (which was the topic of your previous essay (see URL: click here ). With money, you can build a totally Orwellian world where night is day, falsehood is the truth, and war is peace. Therefore, it is only up to the world to completely reject, at every opportunity, any U.S. talk of democracy or humanity; band together as defenders of civilization against imperial barbarism, and help one another every possible way in the face of the brute-force of the mighty behemoth and its runaway bullying. The world simply does not have a choice. Mere silence somehow legitimizes the daily slaughter of hundreds, thousands, yes, millions of innocents by bullets, drones, bombs and so many other WMDs that the U.S. and other imperialists possess in great abundance.

 

Monish R. Chatterjee received the B.Tech. (Hons) degree in Electronics and Communications Engineering from I.I.T., Kharagpur, India, in 1979, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering, from the University of Iowa, Iowa (more...)
 

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