OpEdNews Op Eds

Venezuela's Future

By       Message Stephen Lendman     Permalink
      (Page 6 of 7 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; , Add Tags Add to My Group(s)

Well Said 1   Supported 1   Interesting 1  
View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com

Author 194
Become a Fan
  (191 fans)
- Advertisement -

Walser repeated the usual canards. Venezuela's PDVSA oil company is "in trouble." The nation "suffers from high public debt." It's experiencing "slowing growth."

Its infrastructure is "failing." Its overall "domestic challenges" are daunting.

"Chavez is known for strutting on the international stage, playing bad boy to the United States. The Ahmadinejads, Castros and Ortegas of our world could count on a hero's welcome in Caracas."

"Chavez's heir will probably be hard-pressed to cast the same giant Bolivarian shadow over the international landscape."

Whoever's eventually chosen will inherit strong popular support. It extends way beyond Venezuela. It's invaluable political capital. Chavez won't lead Venezuela forever. 

His successor must use it wisely. Doing so can sustain Bolivarianism longterm. Venezuelans want it no other way.

Mark Weisbrot headlined "Continuity Likely Even Without Chavez."

- Advertisement -

Last October, he was overwhelmingly reelected. PSUV candidates dominated regional and local elections. Nothing suggests near or intermediate-term change.

Weisbrot explained what other Times contributors omitted. He discussed vital social progress. Poverty was dramatically cut. Extreme poverty dropped over 70%.

Elevating Venezuelans "came from increased employment, not 'government handouts.' "

Millions got free healthcare and education for the first time. "Eligibility for public pensions tripled." In the last two years alone, "hundreds of thousands of (vitally needed) houses" were built.

Throughout Chavez's tenure, "the private sector (grew) faster than the public sector."

- Advertisement -

"If you follow Venezuela and haven't heard this, it's because (media scoundrels provide) the equivalent of a 'tea party' view of the country."

Pre-Chavez years were "economic(ally) disast(rous)." From 1980 - 1998, per capita income fell. Chavez turned disaster into success.

Next Page  1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7

 

Well Said 1   Supported 1   Interesting 1  
View Ratings | Rate It

I was born in 1934, am a retired, progressive small businessman concerned about all the major national and world issues, committed to speak out and write about them.

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon


Go To Commenting

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Writers Guidelines

Contact AuthorContact Author Contact EditorContact Editor Author PageView Authors' Articles
- Advertisement -

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

The McCain-Lieberman Police State Act

Daniel Estulin's "True Story of the Bilderberg Group" and What They May Be Planning Now

Continuity of Government: Coup d'Etat Authority in America

America Facing Depression and Bankruptcy

Lies, Damn Lies and the Murdoch Empire

Mandatory Swine Flu Vaccine Alert