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Aaron Swartz: Suicide or Murder?

By       Message Stephen Lendman     Permalink
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  "DISMISSAL"

"Pursuant to FRCP 48(a), the United States Attorney for the District of Massachusetts, Carmen M. Ortiz, hereby dismisses the case presently pending against Defendant Aaron Swartz."

"In support of this dismissal, the government states that Mr. Swartz died on January 11, 2013."

Omitted was full disclosure about how and most important why. Aaron was no ordinary Internet freedom advocate. His prominence made him a marked man. It cost him his life.

JSTOR didn't press charges. MIT pursued a civil suit. Repercussions remain ongoing.

On January 14, the global hacktivist collective, Anonymous, broke into MIT's website. It replaced its front page. A simple line read: "In Memoriam, Aaron Swartz." 

A statement followed. It called the Justice Department's prosecution "a grotesque miscarriage of justice" and "a distorted and perverse shadow of the justice that Aaron died fighting for."

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"We call for this tragedy to be a basis for a renewed and unwavering commitment to a free and unfettered Internet, spared from censorship with equality of access and franchise for all," it added.

Aaron grew up in suburban Chicago. On January 11, he died in his Brooklyn apartment. He was 26 years old. 

On January 15, suburban Chicago's Highland Park Central Avenue Synagogue was filled to capacity. 

Family, friends and supporters came to honor him. Taren Stinebrickner-Kauffman spoke for others, saying "Aaron wanted so badly to change the world. He wanted it more than money. He wanted it more than fame."

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"When things are hard - and he said it is the important things that are hard - you have to lean into the pain."

Does that sound like someone planning suicide?

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago and can be reached at Email address removed

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I was born in 1934, am a retired, progressive small businessman concerned about all the major national and world issues, committed to speak out and write about them.

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