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Washington Post Anti-Bolivarian Propaganda

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Media scoundrels fail on all counts. They serve wealth, power and privilege. They sacrifice principle and honor. Misinformation and lies substitute for truth. It's standard practice.

Venezuelan private media operate the same way. As long as within the law, they're unchallenged. Chavez wanted it no other way. It's no different now. Not according to Post scoundrels.

"Last week," they said, "the beleaguered owner of the last Venezuelan television station not subservient to the government announced that he was selling his shares to a businessman close to the ruling party."

In 2010, Post editors alleged Chavez forced Guillermo Zuloaga  into exile. He's Globovision's majority owner.

Fact check

He accepted a buyout offer. It'll close after April 14 elections. He did so for financial reasons. He said Globovision's "economically unviable because our revenues no longer cover our cash needs."

He blamed Venezuela's government for his business failures. He said so publicly. He lied.

He's selling to buyers headed by Juan Domingo Cordero. He's a leading Venezuelan entrepreneur. He's an insurance magnate. 

He's vice president of the Caracas Stock Exchange. He was part of a commission created to integrate metropolitan area market activities.

He founded, directs and serves as president of the Venezuelan Institute of Capital Markets. He has extensive business interests. He's unconnected to Venezuela's government. Post editors lied saying so.

They claimed "(t)he silencing of Globovision will leave Venezuela with nine television networks, including five that are state owned and broadcast nearly incessant government propaganda that the four privately-owned channels won't dare to challenge."

Fact check

As explained above, Venezuela has 67 commercial television broadcasters. They operate freely. So do 13 public service and 38 community ones. 

Private ones challenge government policies ad nauseam. Public and community ones expose their propaganda. They do so responsibly.

Post editors claim Globovision "was charged with 'sowing panic' for reporting on an earthquake, fined $2.2 million for its coverage of a bloody prison riot and, most recently, accused again of spreading panic for questioning whether the delay of Mr. Chavez's presidential inauguration during his final illness violated the constitution - which it clearly did."

Fact check

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I was born in 1934, am a retired, progressive small businessman concerned about all the major national and world issues, committed to speak out and write about them.
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