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Understanding Intelligence - Essential for a Rational World

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As we move through the day our brain alerts our conscious self to only those things that need our attention. For example, we might slip on an old pair of shoes and walk around without thinking much about how they feel, but if a pebble suddenly gets caught in our shoe we become aware of the new sensation. ("Excuse me, self, but a pebble may have entered your shoe.") If we put on a new pair of shoes we notice how differently they feel until we get used to them. If they don't fit correctly we are annoyingly aware of them until we take them off. But for the most part we are not conscious of the millions of patterns, large or small, that our intelligent brain processes every day. Most of our intelligence activity is at work in our subconscious mind.

This ability to expect and process normal pattern activity without having to attend to everything we see or hear allows our brain to focus attention on the rapidly changing information that is most important to our survival. It allows us to listen and process what someone is saying while ignoring a passing car. It allows us to assess traffic movements at an intersection without being distracted by the radio. This is important because our capacity for consciousness is a limited resource. Our intelligent brain must conserve this executive function and use it for only the most salient and important aspects of our sensory field.

Introspection and Intentionality

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But we are also able to focus attention on patterns of thought or behavior that are not otherwise calling for our conscious attention. We can introspectively direct our focus to examine the patterns and associations stored in our cortex. We are not a passive audience to our senses. We have a conscious mind with which we can look inwardly to examine our intelligent brain. We can learn things about how the real world is structured from the patterns created in our cortex. We can also rearrange or re-associate these patterns when we find errors in the way they have formed (cognitive therapy being one dramatic example). We can perceive gaps in our knowledge of things and direct our own behavior to gather more information.

Implications for Conscious Thoughts

Our brain forms patterns from sensory input whether we are aware of it or not. This leads me to one of the major implications that I would like to discuss further in a future post. Our intelligent brain is forming patterns and associations based on what we may be seeing or hearing even when we aren't paying conscious attention. We know that repetition strengthens patterns and associations.

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Advertisers and marketers know this as well. They choose words and images to invoke associations most favorable to their purposes and use repetition to reinforce and strengthen those associations within our cerebral cortex. The marketing of ideas and products is effective even when we aren't paying conscious attention to the ads. Think about that the next time you are wandering around a supermarket. Think about it in connection with our political campaigns and the public dialogue we watch on TV or listen to on the radio.


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When we commonly think about intelligence we usually limit our discussion to our conscious problem-solving ability. We usually don't consider that most of our brain's intelligent activity happens at the subconscious level. We are not aware of the extent to which false patterns of information can subconsciously form to subsequently influence our conscious choices and opinions. I believe we can inoculate ourselves against propaganda and false advertising, but only if we have a better understanding of how our intelligent brain operates.

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http://www.datadrivenviewpoints.com

Brian Lynch is a retired social worker who worked in the areas of adult mental health and child protection for many years. His work brought him into direct contact with all the major social issues of the day and many of our basic social (more...)
 

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Please do leave a comment. I would love to hear fr... by Brian Lynch on Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014 at 10:24:58 PM
From: Bob Stuart   (Reprinted with permissi... by Brian Lynch on Thursday, Feb 27, 2014 at 11:02:00 AM
Thanks for the info Brian. we would like to think ... by anna kakol on Thursday, Feb 27, 2014 at 6:59:56 PM
Exactly so. Our intelligent brain is so efficient... by Brian Lynch on Friday, Feb 28, 2014 at 8:24:42 AM