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The Guantanamo Children: These Aren't What You'd Call 'Little League' Terrorists

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He is assessed to be a "HIGH risk" but, Razaq's testimony before an Administrative Review Board in 2006 raises doubts about whether Razaq's was ever involved and cooperated with al-Qaida. During Round 2, he does not appear to have any information that would connect him to al Qaida other than the fact that he went to fight in Chechnya and trained at the al Farouq Training Camp, where others connected to al Qaida have trained. He explicitly says he is not "friends with Usama Bin Laden." He is alleged to be on a "list" but corrects the military charging him with being on a list of suspected al Qaida members by stating the list is a print-out from a computer in Karachi that was taken by a person who "took all the prisoners' names to see if they were listed as being missing."

A Designated Military Officer at the hearing claims again that he and his brother received specialized training on SAM-7A and B missiles. He says it is not true. Then, he explains that "psychological torture" has been used on him to find out if he had trained on the weapon.

This is not the first board I have attended. I attended three other boards. For each Board, I get a new interrogator. Each new interrogator made the allegation that I had trained on SAM-7. Three years ago I was at Camp III and they interrogated me for a month. The air conditioning temperature was 54 degrees. It was very cold. They let me sit there for long hours and they brought big speakers with loud noises. They tortured me while standing up and they insulted me and my religion. They have done many things to me. They have done worse to my brother. While I was being tortured, they asked me whether I had trained on SAM-7 and I told them no. Up to this point, they still ask me and this allegation is still in my folder. If I wanted to lie and say yes, I would have told them when I was being tortured. Please excuse me for what I just said, but this is what happened.

Razaq says he told the interrogators at Camp V about the torture but they wrote it down and did not change anything. He told the interrogators it was cold and he wanted to go back to his cellblock. But, "there was no use in telling them."

Keeping Razaq in detention becomes further dubious when reading this part of the "Intelligence Assessment" from his report:

Detainee has provided no information regarding UBL, UBL's security practices and bodyguards, or any of the other information expected as a result of placement as a UBL bodyguard or security detail member. Detainee has not yet been confirmed to have been a UBL bodyguard, and it is not clear whether he is specifically withholding valuable information about UBL and the bodyguards or whether he had only limited exposure to them. Detainee has been partially exploited but remains of significant intelligence value.

Razaq was transferred back to Saudi Arabia, where he was born, in September of 2007.

It's worth noting with regards to Razaq's age the assessment has what appears to be a discrepancy error that calls into question whether the military really knew his age. In his "Prior History," it reads, "In early 2000, when detainee was 18 years old, his 22-year old brother, Abd Abdallah Ibrahim Latif al-Sharakh, aka (Abbad), was killed while participating in jihad in Chechnya." However, his date of birth is listed as "18 January 1984." He could not have been 18 years old when his brother died if he was actually born in 1984.

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The most well known juvenile detainee to be imprisoned at Guantanamo is Omar Ahmed Khadr. His assessment report from January 2004 explains the reason for his continued detention was because "his father is a senior Al-Qaida financier and reportedly the fourth in command underneath Usama Bin Laden in the Al-Qaida organization." His brother and him were encouraged to go to Afghanistan and fight the US with the support of Al-Qaida and the Taliban. And, according to JTF-GTMO, though just sixteen years old at the time of his travel, he is "intelligent and educated and understands the gravity of his actions and affiliations." And, he admitted to participating in mining operations and "harassing attacks" against US forces.

This assessment stands in stark contrast to then-UN Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy's contention that Khadr is a child soldier whom the US should help rehabilitate.

"Like other children abused by armed groups around the world who are repatriated to their home communities and undergo re-education for their reintegration, Omar should be given the same protections afforded these children"Trying young people for war crimes with regard to acts committed when they are minors could create a dangerous international precedent."

Fortunately, the world did not see the US--the first nation since World War II to prosecute an alleged child soldier for war crimes--proceed with the trying of a child soldier in a military tribunal. Khadr accepted a plea deal. His defense attorney, Dennis Edney, thought a plea deal was the only way Khadr would get out of Guantanamo Bay.

Khadr was not only faced with the prospect of a military tribunal that rested on dubious charges like "Murder in Violation of the Law of War" but he also faced a situation where the judge had allowed the prosecution to admit evidence obtained when he was tortured into the trial.

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The torture of Khadr is worth explicitly noting. Just what he experienced is harrowing to revisit. From an affidavit submitted by Khadr in February 2008, here's just some of the torture Khadr describes:

"Around the time of Ramadan in 2003, an Afghan man, claiming to be from the Afghan government, interrogated me at Guantanamo. A military interrogator was in the room at the time. The Afghan man said his name was "Izmarai" (Lion), and that he was from Wardeq. He spoke mostly in Farsi, and a little in Pashto and English. He had an American flag on his trousers. The Afghan man appeared displeased with the answers that I was giving him, and after some time both the Afghan and the military interrogator left the room. A military official then removed my chair and short-shackled me by my hands and feet to a bolt in the floor. Military officials then moved my hands behind my knees. They left me in the room in this condition for approximately five to six hours, causing me extreme pain. Occasionally, a military officer and the interrogators would come in and laugh at me.

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Kevin Gosztola is a writer and curator of Firedoglake's blog The Dissenter, a blog covering civil liberties in the age of technology. He is an editor for OpEdNews.com and a former intern and videographer for The Nation Magazine.And, he's the (more...)
 

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The Pentagon is a star with its points (light) lop... by Ned Lud on Wednesday, Apr 27, 2011 at 7:24:20 AM
This article brings tears to my eyes - primarily b... by Ronnie Moehrke on Wednesday, Apr 27, 2011 at 10:38:35 AM
This article brings tears to my eyes - primarily b... by Ronnie Moehrke on Wednesday, Apr 27, 2011 at 10:38:37 AM