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The Gospel of the Penniless, Jobless, Marginalized and Despised

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"Being Christian is like being black," Cone said. "It's a paradox. You grow up. You wonder why they treat you like that. And yet at the same time my mother and daddy told me ... 'don't hate like they hate. If you do, you will self-destruct. Hate only kills the hater, not the hated.' It was their faith that gave them the resources to transcend the brutality and see the real beauty. It's a mystery. It's a mystery how African-Americans, after two and half centuries of slavery, another century of lynching and Jim Crow segregation, still come out loving white people. Now, most white people don't think I love them, but I do. They always feel strange when I say that. You see, the deeper the love, the more the passion, especially when the one you love hurt you. Your brothers and sisters, and yet they treat you like the enemy. The paradox is, is that in spite of all that, African-Americans are the only people who've never organized to take down this nation. We have fought. We have given our lives. No matter what they do to us, we still come out whole. Still searching for meaning. I think the resources for that are in the culture and in the religion that is associated with that. That faith and that culture, it was the blues of the spiritual; that faith and that culture gives African-Americans a sense that they are not what white people say they are."

Cone sees the cross as "a paradoxical religious symbol because it inverts the world's value system with the news that hope comes by way of defeat, that suffering and death do not have the last word, that the last shall be first and the first last." This idea, he points out, is absurd to the intellect, "yet profoundly real in the souls of black folk." The crucified Christ, for those who are crucified themselves, manifests "God's loving and liberating presence in the contradictions of black life -- that transcendent presence in the lives of black Christians that empowered them to believe that ultimately, in God's eschatological future, they would not be defeated by the 'troubles of the world,' no matter how great and painful their suffering." Cone elucidates this paradox, what he calls "this absurd claim of faith," by pointing out that to cling to this absurdity was possible only when one was shorn of power, when one was unable to be proud and mighty, when one understood that he was not called by God to rule over others. "The cross was God's critique of power -- white power -- with powerless love, snatching victory out of defeat."

"It's like love," he said. "It's something you cannot articulate. It's self-evident in its own living. And I've seen it among many black Christians who struggle, particularly in the civil rights movement. They know they're going to die. They know they're not going to win in the obvious way of winning. But they have to do what they gonna do because the reality that they encounter in that spiritual moment, that reality is more powerful than the opposition, than that which contradicts it. People respond to what empowers them inside. It makes them know they are somebody when the world treats them as nobody. When you can do that, when you can act out of that spirit, then you know there is a reality that is much bigger than you. And that's, that's what black religion bears witness to in all of its flaws. It bears witness to a reality that empowers people to do that which seems impossible. I grew up with that. I really don't ever remember wishing I was white. I may have, but I really don't remember. It's because the reality of my own community was so strong, that that was more important than the material things I saw out there. Their [African-Americans'] music, their preaching, their loving, their dancing -- everything was much more interesting.

"How do a people know that they are not what the world says they are when they have so few social, economic and political reasons in order to claim that humanity?" he asked. "So few political resources. So few economic, educational resources to articulate the humanity. How do they still claim, and be able to see something more than what the world says about them? I think it's in that culture and it's in the faith that is inseparable from that culture. That's why I call the blues secular spirituals. They are a kind of resource, a cultural and mysterious resource that enables a people to express their humanity even though they don't have many resources intellectually and otherwise to express it. Baldwin only finished high school. Wright only the ninth grade. But he still had his say. And B.B. King never got out of grade school. And Louis Armstrong hardly went to school at all. Now, I said to myself, if Louis could blow a trumpet like that, forget it, I'm gonna write theology the way Louis Armstrong blows that trumpet. I want to reach down for those resources that enable people to express themselves when the world says that you have nothing to say.

"People who resist create hope and love of humanity," he said. "The civil rights was a mass movement, but a movement defined by love. You always have both sides. You have bad faith and good faith. I like to write about the good faith. I like to write about faith that resists. I like to write about faith that empowers. I like to write about faith that enables people to look another in the eye and tell 'em what you think. I remember growing up in Arkansas. There were a lot of masks. I wore a mask in Arkansas as a child, not in my own community but when I went down to the white people's town. I knew what they could do to you. But I kept saying to myself, 'One of these days I'm gonna say what I think to white people and make up for lost time,' and so the last 40-something years that's what I been doing. I write to encourage African-Americans to have that inner resource in order to have your say and to say it as clearly, as forcefully, and as truthfully as you can. Not all would be able to do that 'cause white people have a lot of power.

"Now white churches are empty Christ churches," he said. "They ain't the real thing. They just lovin' each other. That's all, that's all that is: socializin' with each other, that's what they do most of the time. You seldom go to a church that has any diversity to it. Now how can that be Christian? God was in Christ reconciling the world unto God's self. Well, it's in white churches that God and Christ separated us from white people. That's what they say. And I'm sayin' as long as you are silent and say nothin' about it, as Reinhold Niebuhr did, say nothin', you are just as guilty as the one who hung him on the tree because you were silent just like Peter. Now if you are silent, you are guilty. If you are gonna worship somebody that was nailed to a tree, you must know that the life of a disciple of that person is not going to be easy. It will make you end up on that tree. And so in this sense, I just want to say that we have to take seriously the faith or else we will be the opposite of what it means.

"My momma and daddy did not have my opportunity, so when I write and speak, I try to write and speak for them," he said. "They not here. They never had a chance to stand before white people and tell 'em what they think. I gotta do it somehow. I try to do that all over the world. I think of Lucy Cone and Charlie Cone, and of all the other Lucy Cones and Charlie Cones that's out there who cannot speak. I think of them. I don't think of myself, I think of them. It deepens my spirituality. It gives me something to hold on to, that I can feel and touch. It's a very spiritual experience, because you are doin' something for people you love who cannot and will never have a chance to speak in a context like this. So, why do I need to speak for myself? I need to speak for them. If you feel passion in my voice, you feel energy in this text, that's because I was thinkin' of Lucy and Charlie, my daddy, and my mama. And as long as I do that, I'll stay on the right track."

This article cross-posted from Truthdig

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Chris Hedges spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He has reported from more than 50 countries and has worked for The Christian Science Monitor, National Public Radio, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Times, for which he was a foreign correspondent for 15 years.

Hedges was part of the team of (more...)
 

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says it any better than James Cone and Chris Hedge... by Lester Shepherd on Monday, Jan 9, 2012 at 3:52:10 PM
It's really too bad that Chris Hedges went to Harv... by R. A. Landbeck on Tuesday, Jan 10, 2012 at 12:27:44 PM
The color we should fear is "evil" not our ski... by Patrick McGean on Tuesday, Jan 10, 2012 at 2:48:06 PM
Bringing up the Black/white paradigm is like flogg... by Luis Magno on Wednesday, Jan 11, 2012 at 7:06:59 AM
"I like people who talk about the real, concrete w... by Rixar13 on Wednesday, Jan 11, 2012 at 8:28:04 AM
"I like people who talk about the real, concrete w... by Rixar13 on Wednesday, Jan 11, 2012 at 8:28:22 AM
For many years I've been promoting a message that ... by E. J. N. on Thursday, Jan 12, 2012 at 8:19:26 PM