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Drone Island in the East River

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Creating Drone Island in the East River no doubt appeals to those in the Israeli government who spy on the U.S. and those in the U.S. government who spy on Israel, but especially to those who want to legitimize and Americanize the U.S. image of Israel's militarism, to make it as unquestionable in the U.S. as U.S. militarism sometimes is.  The U.S. media questions the cost of feeding the hungry, while treating militarism as a jobs program -- even though programs to feed the hungry would more efficiently produce jobs.  The federal government's trillion dollars a year for wars and war preparations doesn't count contributions from state and local governments and universities.  The plans of Cornell and Technion to advance the technology of death on Roosevelt Island were apparently approved because of the money involved.  And in the process a hospital will be destroyed.  That's a typical trade-off.  For a fraction of what we spend on weaponry, we could provide food, water, and medicine to the world.  Many, many more people are killed through what we don't do with our money than through how we do spend it on wars. 

Of course, we could also choose to invest in education instead of militarization. It's no coincidence that the nation that spends $1 trillion every year on war has created $1 trillion in student loan debt, and no coincidence that universities corrupted by military contracts are holding forums promoting war in Syria.

An early supporter of Technion who would be outraged at its current practices is Albert Einstein, who said "You cannot simultaneously prevent and prepare for war."  He was right. We have to choose one or the other.  A lot of people are doing so. 

In September, the University of Edinburgh responded to student protests and withdrew its investment from Ultra Electronics, a company that produces navigation controls for U.S. killer drones. 

Here in New York, the Granny Peace Brigade and Know Drones and the World Can't Wait and lots of other groups have been pressuring the U.N. and the City Council and Congress and educating the public.  The Center for Constitutional Rights is doing legal work against drone murder, and it just may be that lawsuits turn out to be a major tool in stopping the drones.  An organization I work for called RootsAction has set up a petition at BanWeaponizedDrones.org that now has 99,000 signatures in favor of banning weaponized drones. We're going to deliver it to the U.N. and governments when it gets to 100,000, so please go sign it at BanWeaponizedDrones.org

Where I live in Charlottesville, Va., we passed the first city resolution against drones -- weaponized or surveillance, since when three other cities have done the same.  And eight states.  But the state laws have dealt only with surveillance.  They have not sought to limit the weaponization of domestic drones, including with non-lethal weaponry.  Some of them have made exceptions to their surveillance restrictions for the U.S. military.  Four cities is not a lot, and I think one reason why is the complexities of the surveillance issue. I think cities would more readily pass resolutions commiting not to use weaponized drones, and I'd love to see New York City asked to do that.  Even a failure on that would wake a lot of people up to a new danger.

Drone bases around the country are facing endless protests, as I'm sure a Drone Island in the East River will if created.  If New Yorkers can chase David Petraeus away, I'm sure they can chase Technion away!

Nowhere has seen more or better nonviolent resistance to drones that Hancock air base in upstate, New York.  But people have been risking and serving serious jail sentences to call attention and build resistance to these operations all over the country, including in Niagara Falls this past weekend, where activists are advancing a plan to turn the military airport into an array of solar panels that could power half the state.

This November, like this past April, will be a time of drone protests everywhere, and of Code Pink's drone summit in D.C.

Next Tuesday Congressman Grayson will hear testimony from two kids injured in Pakistan by a U.S. drone, although the U.S. won't let their lawyer come.  And yesterday, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch released reports on drones full of great information, but still maintaining that some drone murders are legal and some aren't.  They and the UN special rapporteur will be at NYU Law School on Tuesday and you have to RSVP at the Open Society Foundation.  And on Wednesday Brave New Films will release its film on drone killing.

As we take on the drones, I think we should bear a few key points in mind.  Foreign lives are not worth less than local ones.  Killing with one kind of weapon is not worse than killing with another kind.  Killing is evil and illegal whether or not you call it a war.  The killing is multiplied by the spending of funds on it that could have been spent saving lives.  A war is not an activity marred by atrocities and war crimes.  War is the crime.  We shouldn't oppose waste at the Pentagon more fervently than we oppose efficiency at the Pentagon.  If we can stop believing in just torture or humane rape or good slavery, we can stop believing in acceptable war.  If the government of Israel makes war we should employ every nonviolent tool to resist it -- and the very same goes for the government of the United States of America.

ADDENDUM: I mentioned and there was discussion of at this event Amnesty Intl.'s recommendations to the world:

"To the international community including the UN, other states and intergovernmental organizations:

"Oppose unlawful US policies and practices on the deliberate use of lethal force against
terrorism suspects, and urge the USA to take the measures outlined above. States should officially
protest and pursue remedies under international law when lethal force is unlawfully used by the
USA or other states, in violation of the right to life, against individuals on their territory or against
their nationals.
 
"Refrain from participating in any way in US drone strikes, including by sharing intelligence or
facilities, conducted in violation of international human rights law and, where applicable in specific
zones of armed conflict, international humanitarian law.
 
"Refuse to permit the international transfer of drone weapons in circumstances where there is a
substantial risk the recipients would use the weapons to commit serious violations of international
human rights law or international humanitarian law."
 

It seems that a U.S./Israeli university on Roosevelt Island would be constantly transfering drone technology either to the U.S. or to Israel, either of which would be a violation of the law.

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http://davidswanson.org

David Swanson is the author of "When the World Outlawed War," "War Is A Lie" and "Daybreak: Undoing the Imperial Presidency and Forming a More Perfect Union." He blogs at http://davidswanson.org and http://warisacrime.org and works for the online (more...)
 
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