Share on Google Plus Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on PInterest Share on Fark! Share on Reddit Share on StumbleUpon Tell A Friend 1 (1 Shares)  
Printer Friendly Page Save As Favorite View Favorites View Article Stats   2 comments

Life Arts

Django's Vengeance

By (about the author)     Permalink       (Page 2 of 2 pages)
Related Topic(s): ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; (more...) , Add Tags  (less...) Add to My Group(s)

View Ratings | Rate It

opednews.com Headlined to H4 1/10/13

Become a Fan
  (18 fans)
"I really like "Django Unchained," but I didn't like watching it amid the moronic laughter of some of his movie-geek fans. No filmmaker gives you as much as gleefully as [Tarantino] does. He's 49 now, and there's a new maturity in his style."

I can understand that Cecil Brown "hated" the film, but clearly Mr. Morris did not.

I'm quite sensitive to the perception of white money, white director, white screenwriter, black cinema.  Understandably this is a very prickly topic, and can be perceived in any number of ways.  Cecil Brown compares the plantation presented in the film to today's Hollywood:

"What are the social conditions that would permit Django to be the big howling, empty n-word joke that it is? One of these social conditions, certainly, involves the relationship between black actors and Hollywood as a symbol of the plantation system. "The plantation is called CandieLand (Candyland) and is meant to refer to Hollywood itself as a producer of entertainment (Candy). Get it?"

Really?

As Hollywood did not exist during the timeframe of the film, I saw no references in the film itself to suggest that this is so.  Actual candy predates the motion picture system.  This is an assumption, and a bit of a leap onto a pretty thin branch.  It may be Tarantino's style to infuse everything with references to Hollywood, but the plantation system during slave times?  Would Tarantino even think of this comparison?

That metaphor seems to originate with Ishmael Reed, who was admittedly biased against the film right from the opening credits.  Reed wrote:

"Tarantino's fictional blacks apparently lack that part of the brain that makes one compassionate. While some blacks are being brutalized other blacks go about their business. In one scene, a black woman is being whipped while nearby a black woman is enjoying herself on a swing."

Those particular characters are obviously there to make a point about the divide and conquer strategies employed during slavery to create different classes of slaves, the house slave vs. the field slave.  As such it would be more appropriate to examine in terms of class, and not race.  The house slave vs. field slave distinction is obviously not an invention of Tarantino's, as Mr. Reed knows full well, but an expression of known historical phenomena with resonance and relevance today.  This is a highly-charged emotional topic, but it's certainly not all concocted whole cloth by the director.  He is merely pointing his camera in that direction.

Reed then admonishes the film for what it isn't.  It is not a story about a slave revolt.  That's true.  It uses the genre cliche of a single man on an obsessive quest to save his lover.  This makes for a tighter plot and a more focused story.  It could have veered off in any number of directions, but this is the story.  A slave is freed, learns to become a bounty hunter, becomes a top-notch bounty hunter, a killer, and saves his wife from slavery.  How this particular narrative could earn so much ire, I still don't understand.


We should be angry over slavery as well as racism.  But lashing out at those who are trying to shine a light on both?

Tarantino has not only looked at slavery unflinchingly, but taken it to new levels of abstraction for modern audiences to ponder over.  This is a very brave film that uses certain pathways into modern audience perceptions so as to bring home very real historical points, points which apply today.  The psychology at work is universal, and power disparity and the stripping of human rights goes on right now somewhere in the world.  Tarantino has used his own understanding and skills to craft a new take on an old subject, the way it most certainly wasn't taught in high school.  For that alone he should be treated seriously and given some leeway, some fictional license to explore things on screen.  The alleged hidden racist agenda of the director is simply not supportable.  Filming a situation and endorsing a situation are two very different things.

Tarantino responded to some negative audience members at a preview screening:

"It's a rough movie. As bad as some of the sh*t is in this film, a lot worse sh*t was going on. This is the nice version."

I do support the film, and I consider it worthy of serious consideration.  Coincidentally, the NAACP has nominated the film in four different categories for its "Image Awards."

"Despite a controversy over its use of the n-word, Tarantion's film collected four nominations, one for best picture and others for Jamie Foxx, Samuel L. Jackson and Kerry Washington." (Hollywood Reporter)
Joe Giambrone is a filmmaker and author of Hell of a Deal: A Supernatural Satire. He edits The Political Film Blog, which welcomes submissions. polfilmblog at gmail.

Next Page  1  |  2

 

http://politicalfilm.wordpress.com/

Political Film Blog Author of HELL OF A DEAL: A Supernatural Satire, a tale of Hollywood's accommodation with torture and militarism.

Share on Google Plus Submit to Twitter Add this Page to Facebook! Share on LinkedIn Pin It! Add this Page to Fark! Submit to Reddit Submit to Stumble Upon

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Follow Me on Twitter

Contact Author Contact Editor View Authors' Articles

Most Popular Articles by this Author:     (View All Most Popular Articles by this Author)

Is This the Man Who "Radicalized" Dzhokhar Tsarnaev?

The U.N. Would Never Lie to George Monbiot

The Future Children of Fukushima

Genocide and the Native American Experience

Nuclear Nightmare Worsens

Do I trust Christopher Nolan or his Batman?

Comments

The time limit for entering new comments on this article has expired.

This limit can be removed. Our paid membership program is designed to give you many benefits, such as removing this time limit. To learn more, please click here.

Comments: Expand   Shrink   Hide  
2 people are discussing this page, with 2 comments
To view all comments:
Expand Comments
(Or you can set your preferences to show all comments, always)

but  Tarantino is the symbol of   a... by Mark Sashine on Thursday, Jan 10, 2013 at 2:58:52 PM
Mark, I want you to read this piece: click here... by Ned Lud on Friday, Jan 11, 2013 at 8:50:41 AM