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Challenging the Neocons on Iran

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The Leveretts debunk that notion by detailing a series of episodes beginning with President Hashemi Rafsanjani's effort to improve relations in 1991 and again in 1995 and Iran's offer to cooperate against Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and, more generally after 9/11, about which Hillary Mann Leverett had personal experience.

Finally, they provide the most detailed analysis available on the 2003 Iranian proposal for a "roadmap" for negotiations with the United States, which the Bush administration gave the back of its hand.

The central message of Going to Tehran is that the United States has been unwilling to let go of the demand for Iran's subordination to dominant U.S. power in the region. The Leveretts identify the decisive turning point in the U.S. "quest for dominance in the Middle East" as the collapse of the Soviet Union, which they say "liberated the United States from balance of power constraints."

They cite the recollection of senior advisers to Secretary of State James Baker that the George H. W. Bush administration considered engagement with Iran as part of a post-Gulf War strategy but decided in the aftermath of the Soviet adversary's disappearance that "it didn't need to."

Subsequent U.S. policy in the region, including what former National Security Adviser Bent Scowcroft called "the nutty idea" of "dual containment" of Iraq and Iran, they argue, has flowed from the new incentive for Washington to maintain and enhance its dominance in the Middle East.

The authors offer a succinct analysis of the Clinton administration's regional and Iran policies as precursors to Bush's Iraq War and Iran regime change policy. Their account suggests that the role of Republican neoconservatives in those policies should not be exaggerated, and that more fundamental political-institutional interests were already pushing the U.S. national security state in that direction before 2001.

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They analyze the Bush administration's flirtation with regime change and the Obama administration's less-than-half-hearted diplomatic engagement with Iran as both motivated by a refusal to budge from a stance of maintaining the status quo of U.S.-Israeli hegemony.

Consistent with but going beyond the Leveretts' analysis is the Bush conviction that the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq had shaken the Iranians, and that there was no need to make the slightest concession to the regime. The Obama administration has apparently fallen into the same conceptual trap, believing that the United States and its allies have Iran by the throat because of its "crippling sanctions."

Thanks to the Leveretts, opponents of U.S. policies of domination and intervention in the Middle East have a new and rich source of analysis to argue against those policies more effectively.

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Gareth Porter (born 18 June 1942, Independence, Kansas) is an American historian, investigative journalist and policy analyst on U.S. foreign and military policy. A strong opponent of U.S. wars in Southeast Asia, and the Middle East, he has also (more...)
 

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