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The Myth That Japan Is Broke: The World's Largest "Debtor" Is Now the World's Largest Creditor

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Modern Japan by Asianinfo.org
 

Japan's massive government debt conceals massive benefits for the Japanese people, with lessons for the U.S. debt "crisis."

In an April 2012 article in Forbes titled "If Japan Is Broke, How Is It Bailing Out Europe?", Eamonn Fingleton pointed out the Japanese government was by far the largest single non-eurozone contributor to the latest Euro rescue effort.  This, he said, is "the same government that has been going round pretending to be bankrupt (or at least offering no serious rebuttal when benighted American and British commentators portray Japanese public finances as a trainwreck)."  Noting that it was also Japan that rescued the IMF system virtually single-handedly at the height of the global panic in 2009, Fingleton asked:

How can a nation whose government is supposedly the most overborrowed in the advanced world afford such generosity? . . .

The betting is that Japan's true public finances are far stronger than the Western press has been led to believe. What is undeniable is that the Japanese Ministry of Finance is one of the most opaque in the world . . . .

Fingleton acknowledged that the Japanese government's liabilities are large, but said we also need to look at the asset side of the balance sheet:

[T]he Tokyo Finance Ministry is increasingly borrowing from the Japanese public not to finance out-of-control government spending at home but rather abroad. Besides stepping up to the plate to keep the IMF in business, Tokyo has long been the lender of last resort to both the U.S. and British governments. Meanwhile it borrows 10-year money at an interest rate of just 1.0 percent, the second lowest rate of any borrower in the world after the government of Switzerland.

It's a good deal for the Japanese government: it can borrow 10-year money at 1 percent and lend it to the U.S. at 1.6 percent (the going rate on U.S. 10-year bonds), making a tidy spread. 

Japan's debt-to-GDP ratio is nearly 230%, the worst of any major country in the world.  Yet Japan remains the world's largest creditor country, with net foreign assets of $3.19 trillion.  In 2010, its GDP per capita was more than that of France, Germany, the U.K. and Italy.  And while China's economy   is now larger than Japan's because of its burgeoning population (1.3 billion versus 128 million), China's $5,414 GDP per capita is only 12 percent of Japan's $45,920.

How to explain these anomalies?  Fully 95 percent of Japan's national debt is held domestically by the Japanese themselves.  

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Over 20% of the debt is held by Japan Post Bank, the Bank of Japan, and other government entities.  Japan Post is the largest holder of domestic savings in the world, and it returns interest to its Japanese customers.  Although theoretically privatized in 2007, it has been a political football, and 100% of its stock is still owned by the government.  The Bank of Japan is 55% government-owned and 100% government-controlled.   

Of the remaining debt, over 60% is held by Japanese banks, insurance companies and pension funds.  Another chunk is held by individual Japanese savers.  Only 5% is held by foreigners, mostly central banks.  As noted in a September 2011 article in The New York Times:

The Japanese government is in deep debt, but the rest of Japan has ample money to spare.

The Japanese government's debt is the people's money.  They own each other, and they collectively reap the benefits. 

Myths of the Japanese Debt-to-GDP Ratio

Japan's debt-to-GDP ratio looks bad.  But as economist Hazel Henderson notes, this is just a matter of accounting practice--a practice that she and other experts contend is misleading.  Japan leads globally in virtually all areas of high-tech manufacturing, including aerospace.  The debt on the other side of its balance sheet represents the payoffs from all this productivity to the Japanese people.    

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According to Gary Shilling, writing on Bloomberg in June 2012, more than half of Japanese public spending goes for debt service and social security payments.  Debt service is paid as interest to Japanese "savers."  Social security and interest on the national debt are not included in GDP, but these are actually the social safety net and public dividends of a highly productive economy.  These, more than the military weapons and "financial products" that compose a major portion of U.S. GDP, are the real fruits of a nation's industry.  For Japan, they represent the enjoyment by the people of the enormous output of their high-tech industrial base. 

Shilling writes:  

Government deficits are supposed to stimulate the economy, yet the composition of Japanese public spending isn't particularly helpful. Debt service and social-security payments -- generally non-stimulative -- are expected to consume 53.5 percent of total outlays for 2012 . . . .

So says conventional theory, but social security and interest paid to domestic savers actually do stimulate the economy.  They do it by getting money into the pockets of the people, increasing "demand."  Consumers with money to spend then fill the shopping malls, increasing orders for more products, driving up manufacturing and employment. 

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Ellen Brown is an attorney, founder of the Public Banking Institute, and author of twelve books including the best-selling WEB OF DEBT. In THE PUBLIC BANK SOLUTION, her latest book, she explores successful public banking models historically and (more...)
 

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Yep, Japan proves that high "debt" is compatible w... by Ernie Messerschmidt on Thursday, Sep 6, 2012 at 10:03:44 PM
Those who does not love EB may have problem with m... by Ethan Hollow on Friday, Sep 7, 2012 at 7:14:12 AM
The wealth of Japan is yet another example of the ... by Laurence Almand on Friday, Sep 7, 2012 at 3:29:46 PM
__Another Excellent Article by Mrs. E. Brown___Jap... by jean labrek on Friday, Sep 7, 2012 at 11:21:49 PM
on economy and geopolitics... by jean labrek on Friday, Sep 7, 2012 at 11:27:14 PM