View Quotations by:     Authors     Subjects     Tag     Country     Date Range

Charles Darwin Quotations

Search for an Author:

Browse our list of 1154 quotation authors by Last Name:
A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z  

Charles Darwin



6 Quotation(s) Total:

     Page 1 of 1

As practice is requisite with the ordinary movements of the body, such as walking, so it seems to be with laughing and weeping. The art of screaming, on the other hand, from being of service to infants, has become finely developed from the earliest days.

[full quote]   [add comments]   [Rate]   [Share]

Charles Darwin

In joy the face expands, in grief it lengthens.

[full quote]   [add comments]   [Rate]   [Share]

Charles Darwin

It is notorious how powerful is the force of habit. The most complex and difficult movements can in time be performed without the least effort or
consciousness.

[full quote]   [add comments]   [Rate]   [Share]

Charles Darwin

Music has a wonderful power... of recalling in a vague and indefinite manner, those strong emotions which were felt during long-past ages, when, as is probable, our early progenitors courted each other by the aid of vocal tones.

[full quote]   [add comments]   [Rate]   [Share]

Charles Darwin

The sound of laughter is produced by a deep inspiration followed by short, interrupted, spasmodic contractions of the chest, and especially of the diaphragm. Hence we hear of ||laughter holding both his sides. From the shaking of the body, the head nods to and fro. The lower jaw often quivers up and down, as is likewise the case with some species of baboons, when they are much pleased.
During laughter the mouth is opened more or less widely, with...
[full quote]   [add comments]   [Rate]   [Share]

Charles Darwin

Under a transport of joy or of vivid pleasure, there is a strong tendency to various purposeless movements, and to the utterance of various sounds. We see this in our young children, in their loud laughter, clapping of hands, and jumping or joy; in the bounding and barking of a dog when going out to walk with his master; and in the frisking of a horse when turned out into an open field. Joy quickens the circulation, and this stimulates the brain,...
[full quote]   [add comments]   [Rate]   [Share]

Charles Darwin

View Author Page at Wikipedia

Search for Charles Darwin at Amazon.com

Go to List of Authors

Tell a Friend: Tell A Friend


Copyright © 2002-2015, OpEdNews

Powered by Populum